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New research to stop children dying from treatable infections

New research is being carried out in Northampton to try to reduce the number of children dying from treatable infections.

New research is being carried out in Northampton to try to reduce the number of children dying from treatable infections.

Figures show under-5s in the UK are twice as likely to die from conditions such as pneumonia and sepsis than children in Sweden.

Now an 18 month study led by the University of Northampton is being carried out to discover why survival rates here are so low and what can be done about it.

ITV News Anglia has been speaking to a mother from Kettering who knows first hand how important it is to improve the way we diagnose and treat deadly infections in children.

  • Click to watch the report by Liz Summers

Top motorcycle racer to inspire Northampton girls

Maria Costello. Credit: ITV News Anglia.

Top motorcycle racer Maria Costello will be aiming to inspire teenage girls in Northampton to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and maths when she visits them today.

The former world record holder, who was born in the town, is due to speak at the University of Northampton's Girls Going Global event as part of International Women's Day.

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Government backing for university relocation scheme

An artist's impression of the new University of Northampton campus.

The University of Northampton's relocation plans have moved a step forward after it was included on a list of projects in line to get a government funding guarantee.

The £330m scheme, for a new campus at Avon Nunn Mills, is one of 15 to secure the backing from the Treasury.

It means the government will act as a guarantor for a proportion of the capital value of the project and aims to give private investors more confidence to get involved.

Danny Alexander, Treasury Chief Secretary, said: "What we see today is the extent to which the government is reaching out to help the private sector build Britain's key infrastructure."

Students working to preserve ancient pictorial language

Yesterday we were treated to a fascinating insight into the pictorial language used in one of the most remote parts of China.

The Naxi (Nashi) people - based in the south west of the country - use Dongba Pictograms as their main form of written communication...but with the pace of change that's taking place there, it's feared the language could die out.

In the second of two special reports, Russell Hookey rejoins students from the University of Northampton to find out more about how they're trying to preserve this ancient tradition.