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£40,000 raised to help couple hurt in Thailand crash

  • Video report by ITV News Anglia's Hannah Pettifer

More than £40,000 has been raised to help a travel agent from Harlow and her boyfriend, who have been seriously injured in a car crash while on holiday in Thailand.

Abbie Sontag and Pete Brudenell are now in hospital in Bangkok, having undergone several emergency operations.

However, Abbie has found out that her travel insurance doesn't cover her medical bills which may reach nearly £60,000 by the time she can come home.

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College pays tribute to 'wicked sense of humour' of a 'scientific phenomenon'

Flags are at half mast at the University of Cambridge. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Colleagues at The University of Cambridge have paid tribute to Professor Stephen Hawking as a "scientific phenomenon" who was "one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists since Einstein".

The renowned British physicist died peacefully at his home in Cambridge at the age of 76.

He was a fellow of Gonville and Caius, the university college which was his academic home for almost all of his working life. He described it as a "constant thread running through my life".

He became a fellow of Caius in October 1965, two years after being given an initial medical diagnosis suggesting he had just two years to live.

Today the college paid tribute to a man "whose wicked sense of humour enlivened High Table dinners and saw him spinning uproariously around hall in his wheelchair to the strains of a waltz at a college party".

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“Stephen’s loss is a great one for the college. Caius is Stephen – they have been intertwined for over 50 years.

“There is no doubt that Caius played a very important part in his life, from offering him his first opportunities as a research fellow, keeping him on when he needed support, and flying him back from a conference when he desperately needed medical help.

“Caius is very proud of having both the most famous biologist of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Francis Crick, and the most famous physicist of that period - indeed the most famous scientist since Einstein - Stephen Hawking.”

– Professor Sir Alan Fersht, Master of Caius
People have been signing a book of condolence at the University of Cambridge. Credit: ITV News Anglia

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Fellow Caius Professor Tim Pedley first met Professor Hawking as a research student in 1963.

He remembers his real voice - famously replaced by his trademark American-accented synthesiser as his motor neurone disease worsened.

“Stephen’s own voice was a rather cut-glass English one. By concentrating quite hard and trying to be sensitive to what he was trying to communicate, a few Fellows could interpret what he was saying.

“In College meetings, it was sometimes necessary for us to repeat what he said.”

– Professor Tim Pedley

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Stansted passenger held under Terrorism Act

A man has been arrested and held under the Terrorism Act at Stansted Airport

A passenger has been arrested at Stansted Airport on suspicion of offences under the Terrorism Act.

The 34-year-old man, who is Swedish, was stopped after he arrived on a flight from Stockholm shortly before eight o'clock yesterday morning (Tuesday 19th).

He was then arrested on suspicion of being in possession of material containing information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

He was taken to a police station in Essex where he is still in custody.

Cambridgeshire man returns from fighting against ISIS in Syria

Macer Gifford from Cambridgeshire left a comfortable life as a banker to join Kurdish fighters against

A British man who has just returned from fighting ISIS in Syria says the British government need to do more to support the Kurds and other groups to establish democracy in the country.

Macer Gifford from Cambridgeshire left a comfortable life as a banker to join Kurdish fighters, and compares the Islamic State to the threat posed by Fascism in the 1930s.

  • Click to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Elodie Harper
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