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Solar park approved

Artist's impression of a solar park Credit: ITV Border

A solar park in Cumbria has been given the go ahead after the Government decided not to oppose the plans.

The photovoltaic solar park will cover eight fields at Pasture Farm near Aspatria.

Allerdale Borough Council had initially approved the plans but it was delayed by a last minute intervention from Eric Pickles, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government. He had received a request from protestors to hold a public inquiry.

But after examining the issue Mr. Pickles has decided to allow the original decision to stand.

Opponents had tried to stop the plan, by Livos Energy, on the grounds that the solar panels would industrialise the landscape. The area already has a number of wind farms.

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All fur the good of the pine marten population

DNA from pine martens fur will be sent to Ireland Credit: ITV Border
Hair tubes tempts pine martens to leave DNA which can be used by scientists Credit: ITV Border

A project is helping conserve pine martens in Dumfries and Galloway.

DNA is collected from the animals to determine how big a gene pool there is in the area.

"The Commission asked us to set up some monitoring, some new monitoring work and it's a combination of hair tubes, which are these funny orange plastic tubes stuck to trees with food inside and that tempts the pine martens to come up and investigate the bait and then they leave some of their hair on these sticky patches and we can send them off to the lab to get them DNA typed."

– Dr Johnny Birks, Ecologist

Crayfish re-homed as part of £200,000 river scheme

Hundreds of our native crayfish are being rescued from a stretch of river near Penrith during improvement works.

It's part of a £200,000 scheme to "unstraighten" a mile-long section of the River Lyvennet.

Eventually the new river will provide a much better habitat. But in the meantime, each one of the crayfish is being carried to their new home.

Matthew Taylor reports.

Crayfish re-homed by hand

Thousands of our native crayfish are being rescued from a stretch of river in Cumbria during improvement works.

£200,000 is being spent on a scheme to "unstraighten" a mile-long section of the River Lyvennet near Penrith. Eventually the new river will provide a much better habitat. But in the meantime, each one of the crayfish is being carried to their new home by hand.

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Scottish shark project aims for Europe

A project to tag sharks off the south west coast of Scotland hopes to increase it's reach to Europe.

The Scottish Sea Angling Conservation Network set up it's project several years ago in a bid to find out more about the movements of sharks in our waters ... now they're hoping to get European Union money to expand the project throughout Europe.

Our reporter Fiona McIlwraith went out on a boat off Port Logan to find out more.

Project enters shark territory for research

The project tags sharks for scientific research Credit: ITV Border

A project in South West Scotland are tagging sharks for research.

The Scottish Sea Angling Conservation Network is ran by Ian Burrett. Sharks are caught, tagged and released back into the water.

Shark stocks are threatened and it's hoped that gathering data about the sharks will help protect them. The tag has information about the weight, length, sex of any shark, skate or ray they catch. This information is put onto a national database which scientists across Scotland can access to use for research.

The project has been going for several years and has been introduced to six other countries.

Skates, sharks or rays can be tagged for research purposes Credit: ITV Border

Project sinks teeth into European shark tagging

The Scottish Sea Angling Conservation Network set up it's project several years ago. Credit: ITV Border

A project to tag sharks off the south west coast of Scotland hopes to increase it's reach to Europe.

The Scottish Sea Angling Conservation Network set up it's project several years ago in a bid to find out more about the movements of sharks in our waters. Now it's going to expand to other waters around Europe and it's been providing all sorts of benefits to researchers.

"Tagging can give us a lot of information but what it also does which is crucial is that it encourages research. Our work with Marine Scotland and Aberdeen University has got three kids doing PhDs. On shark research migratory movements, genetics so all this is important to input into the management that we were that we were talking about earlier on."

– Ian Burrett Scottish Sea Angling
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