Borders Railway wildlife protected

Team members working on the new Borders Railway are working hard to protect the local wildlife situated along the new route line.

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Full report: Wildlife protected along new Borders rail route

Work to re-build the Borders railway line is now underway, but while bridges are built and tracks are laid, construction workers need to think about protecting the local wildlife.

The track crosses over the River Tweed, which is home to otters, protected fish and a variety of flowers.

Jenny Longden has been visiting the site to find out what is being done to keep them safe:

Network Rail vow to protect conservation area

Tweed Viaduct in the Scottish Borders Credit: ITV News Border

The Tweed viaduct crossing the River Tweed is an area of special conservation under EU regulations, due to the presence of protected species.

Brook Lampreys and Atlantic salmon can be seen in this stretch of the river, and protected flowers and plants grow on the banks.

The Borders railway route is scenic and popular with walkers Credit: ITV News Border

Network Rail are working with Environmental Groups, such as SEPA, to make sure they disturb wildlife as little as possible while building the Waverley line.

Tweed Viaduct Credit: ITV News Border

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Borders Railway team help protect local wildlife

Team members working on the new Borders Railway are working hard to protect the local wildlife situated along the new route line.

Barn owls, otters and badgers are among some of the species being protected by a project aimed at reducing the impact and disturbance to animal habitats during construction.

Some if the work already carried out includes providing local barn owls with an alternative nest box and protecting badger setts.

"An essential part of the re-development of the Borders Railway is to ensure that we are protecting species that have been integral to the Midlothian and Scottish Borders environment for many years.

"Although it is inevitable that a project of this scale will require some de-vegetation and other disturbance to make way for the new line, we are committed to working with SNH and SEPA in their regulatory capacity to make sure we work around important habitats and protected species or plants sensitively and, of course, appropriately."

– Andrew Mitchell, Project Environment Specialist for Network Rail
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