Scottish country dancing: Key to eternal youth?

New research by the University of Cumbria reveals Scottish country dancing is beneficial to the health of older women and can help to delay the ageing process.

Dance your way to a longer life

For many it's an activity just done at weddings or Burn's Night but when you see this report you might want to dance the Dashing White Sergeant a bit more often.

Now there's evidence Scottish country dancing can halt the ageing process.

Researchers from the University of Cumbria and University of Strathclyde found older women who dance are fitter than those who don't, even if they do the same amount of exercise every week.

Hannah McNulty has been getting reaction at a session in Duns in the Borders.

Scottish country dancing classes near you

With the University of Cumbria unveiling research which show Scottish country dancing can delay the ageing process, you may be wanting to put these claims to the test.

ITV Border have compiled a list of groups associated with the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society in our region that you can visit:

  • Annan - Wendy Adams on 01461 500 250
  • Carlisle & Border - Francis Reid on 01228 594 057 or reid825@btinternet.com
  • Castle Douglas - Anne McAteer on 01556 640 363 or mcateeranne@hotmail.com
  • Dumfries - Marion Bennet on 01387 263 106 or info@dumfries-rscds.org
  • Duns &District - Graham Nisbet on 01890 781 567 or rgnisbet@yahoo.co.uk
  • Kirkcudbright - Margaret Wright on 01556 620 288 or margaretandbob@hotmail.com
  • Stranraer - Irene McKenzie on 01776 703 498 or imckenzie@supanet.com

For more information about Scottish country dancing or to find out about other groups from around the world you can visit the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society website.

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Health benefits of Scottish country dancing

A new report by the University of Cumbria and the University of Strathclyde has claimed that Scottish country dancing can delay the ageing process.

Researchers found that this type of physical activity can delay the ageing process on 'locomotion-related activities' in older women and can benefit their functional ability.

The university's Active Ageing Research Group published its recent findings in the 'Journal of Aging and Physical Activity'.

But what other health benefits are there in this type of dance?

Scottish country dancing can:

  • burn between 390-425 calories in a typical dance session - the same as you would burn playing badminton or golfing while carrying your bag
  • help to prevent diseases like diabetes, heart disease and arthritis - regularly taking part in any form moderate exercise can also help to reduce your chances of getting these
  • help to prevent degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's - the need to be co-ordinated and keep up with timings keeps your brain engaged
  • build bone density, core strength and agility
  • reduce stress and improve your mood

Scottish country dancing beneficial to the health of older women

New research has found that Scottish country dancing can delay the ageing process Credit: ITV News Border

New research by the University of Cumbria has found that, not only is Scottish country dancing is beneficial to the health of older women, but that it can help to delay the ageing process.

The university's Active Ageing Research Group published its recent findings in the 'Journal of Aging and Physical Activity'.

Researchers found that this type of physical activity can delay the ageing process on 'locomotion-related activities' in older women and can benefit their functional ability.

The team worked with the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow on the paper.

They analysed data from women aged between 60 and 80, who had taken part in Scottish country dancing for at least ten years, and their ability to perform day-to-day tasks in comparison to non-dancers of the same age group.

Scottish country dancing 'delays the ageing process'

New research claims Scottish country dancing can delay ageing process.

The study by the University of Cumbria revealed it is beneficial to the health of older women and can help to delay the ageing process.

The university's Active Ageing Research Group worked with a team at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow to published the recent findings in the 'Journal of Aging and Physical Activity'.