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Local authorities argue against storage of dismantled nuclear submarines

HMS Dreadnought, the Royal Navy's first nuclear-powered submarine Credit: PA

There are calls for neither Sellafield nor Chapelcross to be chosen to store radioactive waste from dismantled nuclear submarines.

They come after the Ministry of Defence included the two facilities on a shortlist of potential sites for the project.

But both local authorities have formally objected to the idea, saying it won't benefit their area.

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Cumbria connected to superfast broadband

93% of homes and businesses will have superfast broadband by December 2015 Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

The roll out of superfast broadband is now in full swing across Cumbria, with a project to build a fibre network around the County ahead of schedule.

Connecting Cumbria will connect 93% of homes and businesses in the region with superfast broadband by December 2015. So far more than 66% have been connected.

Elsewhere in Cumbria, BT's engineers are working to deliver fibre to areas including Orton, Pooley Bridge, Grange-over-Sands, Windermere, Shap and Glenridding in 2015.

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Digging deep for charity

The pink digger Credit: ITV Border

A digger in Penrith has been given a make-over to raise money for two local hospices.

The company that owns the pink JCB will donate part of the fees every time it is hired to Eden Valley Hospice and Hospice at Home Carlisle and North Lakeland.

Last year the company raised £56,000 for the charities.

From scallops to radioactive sludge

An Appleby company's equipment could help remove radioactive sludge from Sellafield Credit: ITV Border

An Appleby company that began by making scallop dredging equipment for the fishing industry has adapted its technology to help clean up nuclear sites.

Barrnon Ltd has developed two pieces of robotic equipment that can remove radioactive sludge from the storage ponds at Sellafield.

The prototypes have been developed at the National Nuclear Laboratory in Workington.

The printer powered by peddling pupils.

A pupil cycling to power the printer Credit: ITV Border

A school in Southern Scotland has come up with a novel way of saving energy while teaching pupils about the environment.

St.Michael's in Dumfries has started using a bike to power one of their printers.

The school hopes it will help its pupils, who take turn cycling, learn how much energy is needed to power a single piece of technology.

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