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Health bosses 'welcome' investigation into death rates

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust is going to be investigated over their mortality rates.

The Trust has already investigated more than 1100 deaths at the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle and West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven but the review will look into why there were 18 excess deaths for every 100 expected between 2011 and 2012.

Death rates at 14 hospitals are going to be reviewed following a damning report into deaths at Stafford Hospital.

The review will be headed by Sir Bruce Keogh, the man in charge of the NHS.

The Trust is in the middle of being taken over by Northumbria NHS Trust after a series of high profile problems concerning finances and patient care. Dr Jeremy Rushmer is Director of Clinical Transformation and is involved in the acquisition process. He says he isn't surprised by the investigation.

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'Health and safety must be taken seriously'

"Each year, instead of enjoying the occasion, families of workers in Scotland who failed to come home from work spend Christmas and the New Year thinking of the loved ones who are not there to enjoy it with them.

"Hundreds of other workers who have had their lives changed by major injury will be experiencing difficulties of their own.

"Health and safety in the workplace needs to be taken seriously. I hope that in 2013 employers will tackle the real dangers that workers face and not mire themselves in pointless paperwork so we can reduce the number of workplace deaths and major injury."

– David Snowball, HSE Director for Scotland & Northern England

Employers urged to re-think safety after six Cumbrian deaths

Employers are being asked to take a closer look at the risks affecting their workers, as new figures show the number of deaths at work has risen.

Six people from Cumbria died at work last year and 215 people suffered major injuries, compared to five deaths and 219 major injuries in the previous year.

A further 794 workers were forced to take at least three days off, as a result of injuries.

The Health and Safety Executive has raised concerns over safety provisions at work, after overall figures for the UK failed to show a significant fall.

On average, six in every million workers were killed at work between April 2011 and March 2012.

High-risk industries include construction, which had 49 deaths last year, agriculture with 33 deaths and manufacturing with 31 deaths.

“Each year, instead of enjoying the occasion, families of workers who failed to come home from work spend Christmas and the New Year thinking of the loved ones who are not there to enjoy it with them.

“Hundreds of other workers who have had their lives changed by major injury will be experiencing difficulties of their own.

“Health and safety in the workplace needs to be taken seriously. I hope that in 2013 employers will tackle the real dangers that workers face and not mire themselves in pointless paperwork so we can reduce the number of workplace deaths and major injuries.”

– David Snowball, Director for the North, HSE

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