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Grasmere flooding meeting to take place

Flooding in Grasmere. Credit: Jo Spencer/Jeff Moore/PA Images

People in Grasmere are being given the chance to learn about the work that needs to be done to prevent the village from being affected by future flooding.

The area was badly affected by the floods of Storm Desmond in December 2015, and was also left cut off by the destruction of the A591 road.

At a public meeting this evening, local people will be given a copy of the latest flood investigation report - a study carried out by the Environment Agency and Cumbria County Council.

What you need to know: Grasmere flood recommendations

People in Grasmere are being given the chance to learn about the work that needs to be done to protect the village and surrounding area from future flooding.

90 properties were affected by flooding in December 2015 as a result of high water levels in the River Rothay, Easedale Beck, Greenhead Gill and Grasmere Lake.

At a public meeting this evening (Monday 20th February), locals will be given a copy of the latest flood investigation report - a study carried out by the Environment Agency and Cumbria County Council into why the area flooded in December 2015.

The report looks at what, when and why the flooding results and identifies recommendations to minimise future flooding.

It says the earliest record of flooding affecting Grasmere is in the 1670s, and flooding was recorded again in 1967, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2015.

Despite this there are currently no formal flood defences in the village. It is expected to recommend:

  • Investigate options to improve highway drainage across A591. Extended closure of this road had a major impact on the local economy.
  • Develop options to provide advance warning of possible flooding.
  • Implement flood resilience measures within flooded properties. Grants are available to homeowners to help them better protect their homes.
  • Explore opportunities for engineered and natural flood management solutions to be used upstream of Grasmere to slow the flow and manage peak river levels.
  • Review drainage and sewage systems.

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Flooding exhibition to open in Carlisle

Carlisle was devastated by flooding in December 2015. Credit: PA

An exhibition about flooding is taking place at Carlisle Race Course over the next two days.

The Cumbria Flood Expo has been organised by CERT UK, which used to be called Eden Flood Volunteers.

There will be stalls with help and advice about how people can protect their homes from flooding, and what to do if you are flooded.

The organisers are also keen to stress that the deadline to apply for flood resilience grants has been extended to March.

Carlisle business closes for good after repeated flooding

Twelve months after the floods which devastated homes and businesses across Cumbria and the south of Scotland, dozens of traders are still feeling the effects.

One business on Carlisle's Warwick Road is closing for good at the end of the week, with its owner saying he can no longer face the uncertainty.

Michael Coburn's business was flooded for the second time last December. He's not the only one finding it hard to overcome the odds as Matthew Taylor reports.

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Carlisle shop to close due to continued flood damage

Carpet shop on Warwick Rd Credit: ITV Border

The owner of a Carlisle carpet shop is closing the business for good after failing to recover from two severe floods.

Michael Coburn's business was flooded for the second time last December and since then he's been working from office space above his former shop.

"I couldn't face setting up the whole thing again. The thought that it could possibly happen again- I thought no that's it. It's quite sad when you see that your whole life time is washed away."

– Michael Coburn
Michael Coburn Credit: ITV BORDER

Across Cumbria more than 1000 businesses were flooded and around one in five are still closed.

In Carlisle, more than a quarter of flooded businesses have still to re-open.

Claire Armitage Credit: ITV BORDER

Claire Armitage's business was flooded, but she then moved to renovated premises on Warwick Road. She says she's prepared for any future flooding.

"We've decided to stay because my business is here, my house is here, my mum's here, I've lived her for over 20 years so I've just decided to stay."

"We've been there once, we've been there twice and we're just about flood proofed in case it happens again."

– Claire Armitage

Dozens of Allerdale properties still affected by floods

Workington was one of the areas to be flooded. Credit: ITV Border

Dozens of properties in Allerdale are still reeling from last December's floods, according to the local council.

As of this week, 47 homes and 9 businesses are still affected, and Allerdale Borough Council is urging anyone who hasn't already done so to apply for a £5,000 flood resilience grant.

The local authority has already paid out more than £1.2 million in flood resilience grants.

We really want people to plan for the future and take advantage of these grants now – they are only available until 31 March 2017 and no-one knows what funding, if any, will be made available for resilience works in the future. Please don’t delay in making an application.

– Councillor Phil Tibble, Allerdale Borough Council

Kendal flood report presentation

Credit: ITV Border

The final report into how and why Kendal flooded during Storm Desmond last year will be presented to the community tonight.

It also looks at what measures can be taken to prevent it happening again.

The meeting takes place at Sandylands Methodist Church at 7pm.

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