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Dozens of uninsured homeowners still living in uninhabitable properties

Flooded Carlisle Credit: ITV Border

It's claimed that dozens of uninsured homeowners are living in uninhabitable properties, nearly six months after December's floods.

Carlisle Ambassadors, which is a volunteer group, is running a project asking people to give up some of their free time to help the recovery.

We're just saying, whatever is in your hand, whatever you're good at, whatever you're passionate about, whatever your business is, whatever your trade is, would you give it away for one day.

– Andy Fearon, Carlisle Ambassadors

The Give A Day to the City project runs from 6th - 12th June. 13 different projects are running, including House to Home, which is helping several different flood affected homes and another is clearing the Sheepmount football pitches. Roger Smith, the Managing Director of Thomas Graham is in charge of that project

Lot's of people want to get involved and want to help people. If we don't clear the Sheepmount area people can't play football next year. Quite a few colleagues are getting involved and we're still looking for volunteers.

– Roger Smith

You can find out more about the Give A Day To The City projects by clicking here

Flood-hit homes up for auction between 45% and 55% of pre-flood value

Warwick Road during December's floods Credit: ITV Border

An auction is underway this lunchtime of properties hit by December's flooding.

12 homes in the Warwick Road area of Carlisle are up for sale at around 45% to 55% of their pre-flood value.

Auction House Cumbria says vendors are selling up for a variety of reasons.

Some are insured and are stripped out and dried, and they have negotiated a cash settlement from the insurance company.

Some are not insured, and the people want to move on and get the security of the sale and certainty of the contract.

– Colin West, Auctioneer

Watch Hannah McNulty's report on the auction below:

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Kendal bounces back from floods with food festival spectacle

Kendal Food Festival 2016 got underway today, with stalls and bunting laid out under a slightly grey Lake District sky.

The festival plays host to hundreds of artisan food producers, chefs, and food lovers who come to celebrate the best food the North has to offer.

Credit: ITV Border

Attendees can see demonstrations from on coffee roasting, breadmaking and urban foraging, amongst other things.

Credit: ITV Border

Organisers have said of the festival that it celebrates "the spectacular strength, resilience and community spirit that our Northern Counties have shown over the last few months" as parts of the Lake District, including Kendal, recover from December's devastating floods.

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Kendal Festival of Food begins

Kendal's Festival of Food gets underway today as the town aims to bounce back from the effect of flooding in December last year.

Festival organisers say they want to top last year when 23,000 people visited generating £1.6m for the local economy.

This year there will be 80 stalls showcasing the best of Cumbrian food and produce.

Guest chefs Nick Nairns, who was the youngest Scottish chef to win a a Michelin star, and celebrity Northern Irish chef Paul Rankin will be demonstrating their skills and passing on cooking tips and recipes..

Tomorrow marks the 100th day since the floods that devastated parts of Cumbria including Kendal.

The Kendal Festival of Food is on today and tomorrow.

Flood forum events in Kendal and Ambleside

Storm Desmond flooding in Kendal Credit: ITV Border

People affected by flooding in Kendal and Ambleside are being invited to attend Flood Forum events next week to share their experiences.

The events are organised by Cumbria County Council, working alongside the Environment Agency, and are the first stage in the formal process of establishing how and why properties and businesses flooded and what could potentially be done to prevent flooding, or mitigate its impact, in future.

Attendees will be asked exactly what happened in terms of where the water came from, how it entered the property, its depth and other details. Alongside data already held, this property level information will help to build a highly detailed picture of what happened and why.

The information is collated and used to develop a report and recommendations for future action that could minimise the risk or impact of future flooding. Local communities are fully consulted on the contents of these reports, and the recommendations, prior to final publication. Once agreed the reports can be used by communities and agencies as the basis for applications for funding to allow schemes to be implemented. Working with the Environment Agency we aim to share draft reports with local communities for comment by early summer.

The details for the events are:

• Kendal, Town Hall, 14 March, 2.30pm - 8.00pm

• Ambleside, Kelsick Hall, 16 March, 2.00pm – 6.00pm

As well as providing information, attendees will also be able to find out more from a range of organisations, who will be providing advice and guidance on funding, insurance, flood prevention equipment and flood support registration.

“The key to improving our flood resilience in the future is to learn from the events of this winter and tap into local knowledge. We’ve visited around 100 communities already and this next round of flood forums will give local people an opportunity to shape the future of flood risk management in Cumbria.”

– Kath Evans, Environment Agency Flood Risk Manager

Flood recovery fund increases target to £7million

Flooding in Carlisle after Storm Desmond Credit: ITV Border

The group raising money for Cumbria's flood victims has increased its fundraising target to £7million.

Cumbria Community Foundation's Flood Recovery Appeal has already raised £5.7million, but says the cost of December's floods to the county is rising.

The appeal has so far supported more than 2,000 households – 35% of all those affected - with 30-35 grants being awarded per day. An average of £188,000 is being awarded per week with most people receiving money within 48 hours of their applications being considered.

The charity is expecting to see more households applying as families return to their homes - many are still in temporary accommodation.

“The Flood Recovery Appeal has so far responded to the immediate crisis phase of the flooding. We know, however, that recovery takes a long time. Our experience of managing flood funds in 2005 and 2009 tells us that we will need to continue to support some families for 12-18 months after the floods.

“We need to be able to help re-build valuable community facilities and to support the work that charities have done to support people affected by the floods.

“If the appeal continues to spend at the current rate it would be spent up by July 2016. Our trustees are monitoring expenditure to ensure those in greatest need are prioritised.

“We encourage anyone facing financial hardship as a result of the flooding to seek help through the Appeal if they have not done so already.”

– Andy Beeforth, Cumbria Community Foundation chief executive
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