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Relatives lay wreaths to remember Lockerbie victims

A memorial service has taken place in the southern Scottish town of Lockerbie where Pan Am flight 103 came down on the evening of December 21 1988.

The memorial service to mark the 25th anniversary of the Lockerbie bombing at the memorial site at Dryfesdake Cemetery in Lockerbie
The memorial service to mark the 25th anniversary of the Lockerbie bombing at the memorial site at Dryfesdake Cemetery in Lockerbie Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

Wreaths were laid by the families of the victims of the Lockerbie bombing, many of whom had made the journey from the US to be there.

Relatives remember Patricia Ann Klein who lost her life in Lockerbie
Relatives remember Patricia Ann Klein who lost her life in Lockerbie Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

The service was led by the Rev John MacLeod, while readings and prayers were given by representatives of the Lockerbie Corps, Salvation Army, and the Queen.

Relatives prepare to lay flowers during the memorial service
Relatives prepare to lay flowers during the memorial service Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
National

UK, US, and Libya vow to cooperate over Lockerbie

The UK, US and Libya are to further "deepen" their cooperation, as the 25th anniversary of the Lockerbie bombing was marked in a memorial service today. In a joint statement, they said:

The Governments of Libya, the United Kingdom and United States of America reiterate their deepest condolences to the families of the victims of this terrible crime.

We want all those responsible for this most brutal act of terrorism brought to justice, and to understand why it was committed. We are committed to cooperate fully in order to reveal the full facts of the case.

We are striving to further deepen our cooperation and welcome the visit by UK and US investigators to Libya in the near future to discuss all aspects of that cooperation, including sharing of information and documents and access to witnesses.

National

Salmond: Never forget victims of Lockerbie disaster

Lockerbie has been a welcoming place for the relatives who died in the disaster, First Minister Alex Salmond said today.

Speaking to BBC News, Mr Salmond added: "Out of disaster, there are the bonds of friendship.

"I don't think you ever move on, you certainly never forget, but people do rebuild their lives and many have."

First Minister of Scotland Alex Salmond prepares to lay a wreath during Lockerbie memorial service Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
First Minister of Scotland Alex Salmond after laying a wreath Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

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Service to mark Lockerbie anniversary

Dryfesdale Parish Church. Credit: ITV News Border

A special ceremony will take place at Dryfesdale cemetery in Lockerbie this evening, December 21, to mark the 25th anniversary of the Lockerbie bombing.

The service will mark the death of the 270 people killed when the Pan Am flight was blown up in 1988.

Families of the victims will be joined by US and UK dignitaries for tonight's service.

Dryfesdale Parish Church. Credit: ITV News Border
Inside Dryfesdale Parish Church. Credit: ITV News Border
National

Former ambassador: We may never know truth

The truth behind the Lockerbie bombing may never be known, according to a former British ambassador to Libya.

Former British ambassador Oliver Miles said he believes nobody could be brought to justice for the incident - but said he suspected former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi was behind the bombing.

Mr Miles told the BBC:

It was such a shocking and enormous atrocity that clearly nobody was going to rest until the truth was found.

I don't think the truth possibly ever will be found so perhaps we will be talking about this for years to come.

I don't think anybody thinks he was the man behind the bombing, I think the question is whether he was one of the operatives who actually did what had to be done if it was a Libyan bombing - he's supposed to be responsible for getting the bomb on to the plane.

But I don't think anyone thinks he was the mastermind, so to speak - if there was a Libyan mastermind, it was Gaddafi.

While Gaddafi was still in power I never felt there was any real prospect of co-operation from the Libyan side. That's changed. We now have a Libyan regime that has no interest in concealing Gaddafi's crimes - rather the contrary.

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