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Mark Weir died from 'severe multiple injuries'

An inquest into the death of a Cumbrian businessman, who died in a helicopter crash, has heard that he could not have survived the accident.

Mark Weir, who owner the Honister Slate Mine in the Lake District, was killed while flying home in March 2011.

The pathologist's report said he died from severe multiple injuries.

The inquest has also been told that he had nearly crashed previously when the helicopter nose-dived in thick cloud on a trip to the North East but his skill had saved him and his partner.

Inquest into death of Cumbrian businessman Mark Weir

Mark Weir Credit: ITV News Border

A full inquest into the death of Cumbrian businessman Mark Weir has begun in Cleater Moor.

The 45-year-old entrepreneur, from Cockermouth, died in March 2011 after his helicopter crashed shortly after taking off from Honister Slate Mine in the Lake District.

A pathologist report says he died of severe multiple injuries in non-survivable helicopter crash.

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Helicopter crash report

A report by the Air Accident Investigations Branch has found that Cumbrian entrepreneur Mark Weir was 'not qualified to fly at night' when he was killed in his helicopter last year.

The 45 year old from Cockermouth, died on 8 March 2011 after his helicopter crashed shortly after taking off from the Honister Slate Mine that he owned in the Lake District.

Helicopter pilot was 'not qualified to fly at night'

Mark Weir, killed in his helicopter last year Credit: ITV Border

A Cumbrian entrepreneur who was killed in his helicopter last year was 'not qualified to fly at night', a report has found.

Mark Weir, 45, from Cockermouth, died on 8 March 2011 after his helicopter crashed shortly after taking off from the Honister Slate Mine that he owned in the Lake District.

A report by the Air Accident Investigations Branch has found that Mr Weir did not hold a night-flying qualification and had taken off in 'challenging circumstances' with reduced visibility and low cloud.

The report said:

" A number of serious airworthiness issues were identified with the helicopter during the course of the investigation. None of these could be directly linked to the cause of the accident but did raise concerns regarding the way the helicopter was operated."

Mr Weir flew regularly between his home and the mine, which attracted 60,000 visitors a year.

The report also said there was no evidence of mechanical failure and that it was "not possible to determine the mechanism by which control was lost or disorientation occurred".