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Mental health charity seeks help from employers

A leading mental health charity has accused employers across Cumbria of being ignorant and frightened when it comes to taking on staff with learning disabilities.

Five per cent of people living in the county have a learning disability, higher than the national average, but MENCAP says not enough bosses are doing their bit, and are missing out on the benefits. Paul Crone reports

Employers 'missing out' says mental health charity

In the main cafe in Workington Community Hospital, thanks to West House, a voluntary organisation is providing opportunities for people with learning disabilities.

At the Carlisle branch of MENCAP officials say that some employers are ignorant and frightened of taking on someone with learning disabilities.

Adam Farrer and Claire Coleman work at the cafe and explain why they love their jobs:

"You're [employers] are missing out on some really good people, very talented people, who can enhance your company."

– Sheila Gregory is the Chief executive at Carlisle MENCAP

MENCAP is determined to encourage more businesses to get involved.

Read: 'Employers are missing out on some really talented people'

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Mental health charity seeks employers help

Adam Farrer and Claire Coleman who work at Cafe West in Workington Community Hospital. West House is a voluntary organisation providing opportunities for people with learning disabilities. Credit: ITV Border

A leading mental health charity has accused employers across Cumbria of being ignorant and frightened when it comes to taking on staff with learning disabilities.

Five per cent of people living in the county have a learning disability, higher than the national average, but MENCAP says not enough bosses are doing their bit, and are missing out on the benefits.

'Employers are missing out on some really talented people'

A leading mental health charity has accused employers across Cumbria of being ignorant and frightened when it comes to taking on staff with learning disabilities. The Carlisle branch of MENCAP says bosses aren't doing enough and aren't aware of the benefits.

Sheila Gregory is the Chief executive at Carlisle MENCAP:

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A former war photographer suffering from post traumatic stress disorder says living in Cumbria has helped his condition.

Kevin Weaver covered conflicts in places like Bosnia, Romania and Rwanda. Since moving to West Cumbria, he has rediscovered a passion for painting which has been inspired by the Cumbrian landscape.

Report finds children mental health services 'confusing'

A report on children's mental health services in Cumbria has found the system is too confusing for young people and their parents to work out who to see.

It also found waiting times were often too long and not enough money is being spent on children's mental health services.

It's a report that was ordered by Lake District MP Tim Farron after he received a number of complaints about the existing services.

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Cumbrian campaigner says 'No Man Is An Island'

A Cumbrian campaigner has set off to walk a hundred miles from the east to the west of the county, to raise awareness about Mental Health.

Steve Wharton has called his trip "No Man Is An Island", and it'll take him from Kirkby Stephen to Cockermouth.

He's travelling with his ukulele, and will be singing wherever he goes. He wants to encourage people to talk about issues such as depression.

'Mental health issues affect a lot of us'

As a teenager Steve Wharton was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, now he's using his musical talents to raise awareness of mental health issues.

He's going to walk 100 miles from Kirkby Stephen to Cockermouth, talking, and singing, about mental health.

He says more needs to be done to help people be more open about their mental health:

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