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Progress for North Cumbria University Hospitals Trust

Credit: ITV Border

Progress has been made to improve the safety and quality of care at North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust, according to the results of a staff survey published this week.

Although the Trust remains amongst the lowest 20% of acute NHS organisations nationally, the Trust claims the results show that there have been small improvements in many areas. It was ranked above average when compared to other acute NHS trusts for staff receiving equality and diversity, and health and safety training.

The Trust maintains that while the results are pleasing, it knows there is more work to be done.

"The past year has continued to be challenging as we remain in special measures but I am proud to see that despite this, our staff are motivated to implement our improvements and go the extra mile for our patients.

"Although these results are a step in the right direction for the Trust again this year, we are under no illusions an know that we still have a lot of work to do and progress to make which we believe we can achieve."

– Gail Naylor, director of nursing and midwifery at the North Cumbria University Hospitals Trust

Spending on temporary doctors more than doubles

The Trust says the spending is necessary Credit: ITV Border

Hospitals in North Cumbria will spend an estimated £16.5 million on temporary doctors this year, which is £10 million more than three years ago.

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust says it has been open and honest about the recruitment challenges it is faced with.

A spokeswoman for the Trust insisted the spending is an "entirely necessary measure" but local MP Jamie Reed says it's unacceptable.

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North Cumbria University NHS Trust signs up to campaign

Gail Naylor, director of nursing & midwifery, signing up to the campaign Credit: North Cumbria University Hospital NHS Trust

North Cumbria University Hospital NHS Trust has signed up to the 'Hello my name is..' campaign.

The campaign reminds staff to go back to basics and introduce themselves to patients properly.

It was started by Dr Kate Granger in order to improve the patient experience after she became frustrated with the number of staff who failed to introduce themselves to her when she was in hospital.

More than 100 NHS organisations that have joined the movement .

A&E departments 'improving' in North Cumbria

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust has improved. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Accident and emergency departments at West Cumberland Hospital and the Cumberland Infirmary are improving, according to the Care Quality Commission's national patient survey.

The hospitals, run by North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust, showed improvements in six questions, including waiting times, opportunities for relatives to speak to a doctor and receiving prompt attention from staff when needed.

They were listed as 'average' in seven of the eight categories, and 'above' average in the eighth.

  • Arrival at A&E - 8.2/10 - Average
  • Waiting times - 7.0/10 - Above
  • Doctors and nurses - 8.4/10 - Average
  • Care and treatment - 8.0/10 - Average
  • Tests - 8.2/10 - Average
  • Hospital environment and facilities - 8.4/10 - Average
  • Leaving A&E - 6.1/10 - Average
  • Experience overall - 8.6/10 - Average

315 people who had attended one of the Trust’s A&E departments between January and March 2014 took the survey.

The results will be used in the regulation, monitoring and inspection of the Trust.

But, the Trust is aware that in recent weeks the 95% emergency care standard (patients being seen, treated and admitted or discharged from A&E within four hours) was not maintained, and dropped to 85% in October.

“We are delighted with the 2014 results, showing improvement in almost every area and being rated as one of the best performing hospitals in some areas, particularly for waiting times.

“Our emergency departments have been very busy in recent weeks, with high numbers of people attending and our clinical teams have consistently showed their dedication and commitment to their patients. The survey demonstrates real progress for the teams in both of our hospitals who are working hard to provide a safe, caring and compassionate service.”

– Dr Peter Weaving, clinical director for emergency care at North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust

Patients recalled to hospital over infection scare

Hundreds of patients at a Cumbrian hospital are going to have to be tested for infections after equipment that had not been cleaned properly was used in a routine test.

North Cumbria NHS Trust has written to 357 patients who had an endoscopy procedure at the Cumberland Infirmary between 20 May and 19 June.

Hospital bosses say the risks of infection are very low but are urging patients that may be affected to contact a dedicated helpline.

North Cumbria Hospitals Trust referred to health secretary

Two hospitals in North Cumbria have been referred to the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt for failing to deal with mounting debts.

The trust has been referred to the Health Secretary over financial concerns Credit: ITV News Border

The North Cumbria University Hospitals Trust was one of 19 flagged up to Jeremy Hunt for not meeting its statutory duty to break-even in the last financial year.

The trust runs the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle and and the West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven.

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Trust still in special measures despite hiring more staff

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has confirmed that North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust will remain in special measures.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission visited the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle, West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven and the midwifery-led birthing service at Penrith Community Hospital in April and May.

They concluded the Trust has not met the required standards to get out of special measures.

The decision was announced in the House of Commons this afternoon.

Jeremy Hunt says that the Trust is improving but shadow health minister Andy Burnham claims the problems have been caused by cuts to staffing levels.

Trust 'needs longer' to show progress can be 'sustained'

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has confirmed North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust will remain in special measures.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission visited the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle, West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven and the midwifery-led birthing service at Penrith Community Hospital in April and May.

They concluded the trust hadn't met the required standards to get out of special measures.

Sir Mike Richards is the Chief Inspector of Hospitals:

Four key areas of trust 'require improvement'

The trust that runs two of our biggest hospitals will remain in special measures after an inspection by the healthcare watchdog.

The Care Quality Commission rated the North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust - which runs the West Cumberland Hospital in Whitehaven and the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle - in five key areas.

The care provided by staff at the trust was described as good.

But in the four other areas: safety, effectiveness, responsiveness and leadership - it was found to need improvement.

And that gave the trust an overall rating as needing improvement too.

The Trust says they've made important progress. Katie Hunter has this report:

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