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Former Toshiba boss moves to NuGen

Takeshi Yokota is the former Executive Officer and Senior VP of electronics company Toshiba. Credit: NuGen

Takeshi Yokota will take over as the new Chairman of NuGen.

NuGen are currently developing the Moorside nuclear power station in west Cumbria.

Mr. Yokota is the former Executive Officer and Senior Vice President of electronics company Toshiba.

“We look forward to working with our new chairman and board to drive forward our phenomenal project at Moorside. I am confident his renowned international experience combined with being based in the UK will greatly assist in our dealings with key stakeholders, including government.”

– Tom Samson, CEO NuGen

Moorside nuclear plans unchanged following Brexit

An artist impression of NuGen Credit: NuGen

Nuclear power giants NuGen say that they're plans to develop a nuclear plant in west Cumbria are to go ahead as normal following the UK's decision to leave the European Union.

The Moorside Project involves an investment of £20 billion to develop a new nuclear power station.

Before the EU referendum, a number of Cumbrian MPs raised concerns about the implications of a 'leave' vote in regards to the major investment from NuGen.

NuGen is a consortium made up of French, American and Japanese companies and the MPs said they'd made it clear their investments were more secure with the UK as part of the EU.

In a statement, the energy firm say that although they are looking for clarity on policy from the Government, they believe that major investment in nuclear power will provide stability for the UK.

“The Moorside Project continues to progress without change. "NuGen’s shareholders, Toshiba and ENGIE, remain committed to taking forward Moorside - Europe’s largest new nuclear power station - to produce and sell power to the UK grid. We firmly believe the case for new nuclear power stations for the UK is compelling, and unchanged as a result of the referendum.

"New nuclear power stations are vital for the UK’s future prosperity, delivering low-carbon, secure and stably-priced electricity for generations to come, while securing our future indigenous energy supplies on UK soil. NuGen will be in a position to provide power to the UK grid in the mid 2020’s.

"In order to deliver our station on time and on budget, we must secure clarity on policy and ensure the Government does everything it can to deliver investment stability for vital UK infrastructure projects.”

– Spokesperson, NuGen

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Nuclear college to be based in Cumbria

Sellafield Ltd will work with the new college. Credit: PA

A new £15 million nuclear college will be based at two hubs - in Cumbria and Somerset.

The National College for Nuclear is set to open its doors in late 2017, and aims to train the next generation of workers in the nuclear sector.

The Cumbrian hub will be opened at Lakes College in Workington, and will work with Sellafield Ltd and the University of Cumbria.

The announcement means that work will now begin on developing the curriculum which will help to train the next generation of nuclear workers.

It is expected that new qualifications will be available in 2017 that reflect the needs of the nuclear sector and address the skills challenge facing the industry and its supply chain.

– Colin Reed, Sellafield Ltd Human Resources Director

NuGen apologises to Mirehouse residents

A number of public meetings took place on Wednesday evening addressing concerns over the impact a new power station in West Cumbria might have on nearby houses.

The meetings were held after 1600 people living in and around Whitehaven, received letters giving the impression their homes will be compulsory purchased to make way for the Moorside project.

Nuclear Company NuGen has since apologised and says not all properties will be affected.

Kate Walby was in West Cumbria last night:

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Radioactivity levels cut by 70% at Sellafield fuel pond

Sellafield nuclear site Credit: PA

Sellafield say that work to clear up the last of nuclear fuel at the Pile Storage Pond has meant a reduction in radioactivity levels by 70 per cent.

The removal of fuel from the 68-year-old pond is part of Sellafield's 100 year mission to clean up the nuclear site- which is the most complex site in the UK.

The fuel has been transferred to a modern storage building, with the company saying it's now much safer for the public and environment.

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