Changing the space of Sellafield

Since decommissioning work began in 2007, 100 buildings have now been demolished at the Cumbrian nuclear plant.

Live updates

Sellafield Ltd 'welcomes' report

The company that runs Sellafield says it welcomes today's report which highlights a build up of waste and the cost of cleaning up the site. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority owns the site but it is run by Sellafield Ltd.

Sellafield Ltd welcomes the publication of the Public Accounts Committee (PAC)’s report into the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. We will now take our time to fully consider the report, its conclusions and the recommendations of the PAC.

– Sellafield Ltd

Advertisement

Protestors gather against nuclear waste depository

Anti-nuclear protestors have gathered in Bowness-on-Windermere to demonstrate against plans to build an underground storage facility for radio-active waste.

Cumbria County Council and Allerdale and Copeland councils will decide on January 30th whether to proceed to the next stage in the plans.

But those who oppose the decision to site a geological waste facility in West Cumbria say are calling for an end to the "mad plan".

They are concerned about safety issues and add that it will damage the image of Cumbria as a tourist destination.

Cumbria County Council has said that no decision would be made about whether Cumbria should have a repository or not on January 30.

Instead, councillors will be deciding on whether geological experts should carry out the necessary work to see whether Cumbria could be the right location or not.

Hundreds attend meeting in Keswick

More than 500 people attended a meeting in Keswick to discuss their opposition to

the idea of burying radioactive waste being buried under the Lake District or the Solway.

Cumbria County Council, Allerdale Council and Copeland Council are to vote on whether the Government should include West Cumbria in a list of sites being searched for a a new underground repository for high-level radioactive waste.

A quarter of West Cumbria was ruled out of the site search by a preliminary report of the British Geological Survey in 2010.

Seventy five per cent of the area left is within the national park.

Full Report: Sellafield clean-up costs to rise

Sellafield's senior managers have admitted that the cost of cleaning up the nuclear reprocessing site is likely to rise.

They have faced questions from MPs on the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee, who made a visit to Workington.

The committee wants to know how long it will take to deal with hazardous waste, and how much it will cost the taxpayer.

Hannah Lomas was at the meeting.

You can watch her report here:

Advertisement

Sellafield bosses questioned over cost of cleaning up the nuclear reprocessing site

Sellafield
Sellafield Credit: PA

The Public Accounts Committe of the House of Commons has travelled to west Cumbria to hear evidence from Sellafield bosses, following a damning report which highlighted historic safety failures and neglect at the site.

The report found the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority faces a 'considerable challenge' in taking forward decommissioning at Sellafield. The Committee are due to start hearing evidence at 2pm in Workington. It follows an on site visit to Sellafield this morning.

Sellafield scrutinised

A Parliamentary hearing will take place at the Sellafield nuclear plant later following a damning report.

The report said there were considerable challenges that have to be overcome as the site is decommissioned and concerns were raised about safety.

The meeting will take place at the Energus building in Workington at 2pm.

It follows a report from the National Audit Office which said that owing to historic neglect, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority faces a considerable challenge in taking forward decommissioning at Sellafield.

The evidence session, which will take the form of a Parliamentary hearing, will take evidence from John Clarke, of Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, George Beveridge, of Sellafield Ltd, and Phil Wynn Owen, Acting Permanent Secretary and Mark Higson, Department of Energy and Climate Change.

"We are particularly keen to speak to the NDA because although we now see a more robust lifetime plan in place for Sellafield, we cannot say with certainty how long it will take to deal with hazardous radioactive waste at Sellafield or how much it will cost the taxpayer."

– Rt Hon Margaret Hodge, Chair of the Committee
Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories