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Making room for a view

Ullswater after the clear up Credit: Gordon Lightburn

The iconic views of Ullswater’s western shore are open to residents and visitors once more, thanks to a project to clear scrub and manage trees that were increasingly obscuring the view.

Local residents identified the views along the lake shore were becoming increasingly covered by trees, with residents and visitors unable to fully appreciate the beauty of the lake.

This led to the launch of Felling for Views – a project led by the Lake District National Park and Eden Rivers Trust as part of the Ullswater Valley Plan.

Ullswater before the clear up project Credit: Gordon Lightburn

Since August volunteers have undertaken work including tree thinning, scrub clearance and control.

It is hoped it will also help improve safety along the A592 and have a positive effect on the lake shore.

Projects ranger for Lake District National Park, Dylan Jackman, said:

This has been a real success story for Valley Planning. We listened to the community and put Felling for Views into action, creating some stunning vistas from the northern section of the lake that are already benefitting visitors and residents.

It’s a great start and we plan to continue working with others to reveal further view across the lake.”

– Dylan Jackman

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Ullswater's young people ask for more outdoor activities

Young people in Ullswater have asked for more outdoor events in their area Credit: The Lake District National Park

Young people from Ullswater have asked for more outdoor activities in their area.

The 24 11 to 22-year-olds too part in a series of activities with the Lake District National Park, including camping, climbing and wild swimming.

For many of the young people it was the first time they'd explored their local area in this way, with all of them asking for more events like it to take place.

Park management ranger, Rec Cathey, said the area’s young people often felt marginalised and had little experience of pursuits enjoyed by millions of visitors who flocked to their valley.

“They told us they want more outdoor activities, so we linked with The Outward Bound Trust to make things happen.

“We wanted to make events free and accessible so everyone could be included. The response has been fantastic, particularly for our first weekend expedition.

“The idea is to get young people to look at their surroundings in a new light and see why working together is so important.

“We want to captivate the valley’s next generation and foster long-term commitment to the area. It’s been an amazing success story and we hope the work will be written into local strategies and continued in perpetuity.”

– Rec Cathey, Lake District National Park

Mother highlights dangers of open water swimming

A campaign to teach school children about the dangers swimming outside.

It's been launched ahead of the school Summer holidays and just days after the death of a teenager in Dumfries who drowned while swimming in the River Nith.

Lori Carnochan went to meet one mother who knows the dangers of open water swimming only too well.

Mother's turns heartache into campaign tool

Beckie Ramsey from Chorley lost her son after he drowned in a quarry lake in July 2011.

Becky's son Dylan was swimming with his friends in the water when his body started to go into shock due to the cold temperature. He was under the water for around three minutes.

He was given CPR but died, aged 13.

Becky hopes that sharing her story will help others learn about the dangers of outdoor swimming, and perhaps help prevent another unnecessary death.

Mother warns of dangers of open water swimming

Becky talking to the school children as part of the "Doing it for Dylan" campaign Credit: ITV News Border

Around 250 pupils from Ullswater Community College have been learning about the dangers of swimming in open water.

Beckie Ramsey from Chorley lost her son after he drowned in a quarry lake in July 2011. She's been travelling around schools across the UK to teach children about water safety.

It's part of an annual campaign by United Utilities during Drowning Prevention Week.

Becky's son Dylan was swimming with his friends in the water when his body started to go into shock due to the cold temperature. He was under the water for around three minutes.

He was given CPR but died, aged 13.

Becky hopes that sharing her story will help others learn about the dangers of outdoor swimming, and perhaps help prevent another unnecessary death.

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All decked out and back on water

What's believed to be the oldest passenger vessel in the world has been lowered back onto Ullswater after a refit.

The steamer, called 'Lady of the Lake', was first launched in 1877 and has been out of the water for six months to undergo the first major works to her for nearly 40 years.

The decking has been renewed and there is now more indoor space for passengers.

Billy English of Ullswater Steamers told ITV Border about the refit:

The Lady is back on the lake

The Lady of the Lake is being re-launched on Ullswater later today.

The steamer has been out of action for the last six months while it's been given a make over.

The boat, which is thought to be the oldest passenger vessel in the world, can carry up to 220 passengers at a time. It will join the other four boats currently transporting passengers across the lake.

Dozens help to clear up Ullswater

Dozens of volunteers in the Lake District have been taking part in a litter pick.

But it was more than just a case of taking a bag and a good pair of walking shoes.

Many of the volunteers took to the water in a bid to gather as much rubbish as possible and as Katie Hunter reports they certainly found plenty of it:

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