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Stolen car crashed into boat

Police are appealing for witnesses. Credit: ITV Border

Police Scotland are appealing for witnesses after a stolen car was crashed into a boat.

The incident happened on Isle Street in Whithorn, at around 1:30am on Saturday 4 June.

It involved a silver Renault Clio car and a boat which was parked on a trailer on the road.

The car had been stolen sometime earlier in the day, from Park Lane in Whithorn.

Police want to trace a man who was seen running away from the car. He is described as between 5'6" and 5'8" tall, and was wearing a dark coloured hooded top or jacket.

It appears that after the crash a lot of revving of the car engine went on before the driver abandoned the car left the scene. Anyone who may have been woken by the noise and who may have looked out and saw anything should give us a call on 101.

– Constable Kirsty Cantlie

Scotland's first Saint key to new tourist attraction in Galloway

Scotland's first Saint could be the key to a new tourist attraction for a small Galloway town. After a local politician tabled a debate in Holyrood proposing to create a pilgrimage to Whithorn.

Dr Aileen McLeod has joined with historian James Brown in the hope to develop a network of routes all leading to the site where St Ninian first set foot in the country.

Fiona McIlwraith reports:

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Withorn pilgrimage would 'raise profile' of the area

A local politician has tabled a debate in Holyrood proposing to create a pilgrimage to Whithorn.

The small Galloway town is known as the first Christian site in Scotland.

"There will be real benefit for the Royal burgh of Whithorn, for the machars of Galloway and for the whole of the south west of Scotland to be able to benefit from that, and it's not just for Whithorn, there are also some very historical sites along the route, so it's a way of raising the profile of, the historical profile, the cultural profile, the economic profile of Whithorn as the cradle of christianity in Scotland."

– Aileen McLeod MSP, South Scotland, SNP

Pilgrimages could 'bring £2million' to the local economy

A local politician has tabled a debate in Holyrood proposing to create a pilgrimage to Whithorn.

St Ninian's Chapel Credit: ITV News Border

The small Galloway town is known as the first Christian site in Scotland.

St Ninian's Chapel Credit: ITV News Border

Dr Aileen McLeod has joined with historian James Brown to help develop a network of routes, all leading to Whithorn.

James Brown, historian Credit: ITV News Border

Mr Brown said: "We only need 7,000 pilgrims, staying six nights on that journey, and it would bring £2million into the local economy. Pilgrimage tourism is very big worldwide, it doesn't exist in Scotland. If we had it, it's a resilient form of tourism, it's slow tourism, it's sustainable tourism."

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Full Report: All Roads Lead to Whithorn

A documentary film about life in the Royal Burgh of Whithorn is to premiere tomorrow night.

All Roads Lead to Whithorn was filmed in the summer, and everyone in the community was involved.

Throughout the week the film makers have been teaching the children about filming and editing.

Fiona McIlwraith reports.

Newton Stewart man fined £4450 for bird poisoning

A 62-year-old gamekeeper from Dumfries and Galloway has been fined £4450 for poisoning a bird of prey and owning illegal pesticides.

A common buzzard died after it ate a pheasant carcass that Peter Bell, from Newton Stewart, had laced with the highly toxic pesticide carbofuran.

A common buzzard Credit: PA

Mr Bell left the bait in a field on Glasserton Home Farm near Whithorn on 23rd December 2012.

The illegal poisonous substances carbofuran, strychnine and alphachloralose were also found in his tool shed and home during a search in March.

Mr Bell pleaded guilty at Stranraer Sheriff Court to one charge of killing a wild bird and three of having illegal pesticides under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

Craig Harris, wildlife and environment procurator fiscal, said:

"The killing of this buzzard was considered and deliberate criminality. The laying of bait laced with carbofuran was shockingly irresponsible conduct.

"It was compounded by the stocks of other illegal poisons that were kept.

"The law protects wild birds and those who seek to poison them, or continue to possess stocks of illegal poison, can fully expect to be brought before the courts."