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Alvez the Cumbrian Tapir packs his bags for pastures new

Alvez the Tapir is leaving his home at The Lake District Wildlife Park Credit: ITV Border

A tapir born at the Lake District Wildlife Park is preparing to leave Cumbria for pastures new.

Alvez is heading off to a breeding programme in the United Arab Emirates in a few weeks time. He's one of a family of four Brazilian tapirs at the Lake District Wildlife Park.

Credit: ITV Border

The three-year-old is the first calf of his mum and dad Muffin and Rio, and has a younger brother Zico, born in 2015.

Credit: ITV Border

There are four species of Tapirs in Central and South America and South-East Asia. All Tapirs are in decline and their plight is symbolic of the wider threat to their natural habitat in the rain forests. It's hoped that the breeding programme will mean Alvez will soon have a family of his own.

Keeper Leanne with Alvez and Zico Credit: ITV Border

Keeper Leanne Harrington has been looking after the Tapir family since Alvez was only a matter of weeks old. She said:

Alvez was quite a Mummy's boy when he was younger, sticking close by for a long time. Now he has minutes of madness, running around his enclosure. In contrast his little brother is very independent already.

Alvez is quite tolerant of his brother who has a cheeky habit of nipping his older brothers' ankles. They both love having their backs scratched which is great for park guests taking part in Keeper Experiences."

– Leanne Harrington

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Nocturnal wildlife tours start in Dumfries and Galloway

Nocturnal tours. Credit: ITV News

People from across Dumfries and Galloway are taking advantage of a new tour which allows you to view wildlife in the dark.

The Nocturnal Wildlife Tours run from Castle Douglas, and on the walks you can expect to see everything from baby deer to hedgehogs.

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Cumbria's rivers are flowing back in time

A multi-million pound project designed to return parts of Cumbria's countryside to how it used to be is underway.

Hundreds of years ago some of the county's rivers were straightened to make farming easier.

That work is now being reversed in the hope that it will make a better environment for local wildlife.

Amy Dunsmuir has more:

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