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M6 delays following collision

Police are warning of delays. Credit: PA

The M6 has been closed between Junction 37 and Junction 39, following a collision.

Police were called at 12:39pm today (29 July 2015), following an accident that occurred on the M6 southbound carriageway between Junctions 37 and 38.

The Northbound carriageway is also closed between Junctions 37 and 39.

It is expected that two lanes will be reopened in due course.

Motorists are asked to avoid the area and use alternative routes.

There is no further information about the collision at this time.

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Road resurfacing set to cause traffic delays

Credit: ITV Border

Drivers are set to face disruption when a £415,000 road improvement scheme gets underway near Dumfries.

Scotland TranServ is resurfacing a stretch of carriageway on the A5701 from Shieldhill to Blairhall Road - located around five miles north of Dumfries - from 7pm on Sunday 26 July to 6am Friday 7 August.

Transport Scotland say the scheme takes its investment in Dumfries and Galloway in the past 12 months to over £4.5 million.

While work is taking place a convoy system will be in operation overnight with two-way traffic lights in operation during day time hours although there will be no works or traffic management in place from Friday 31 July to Sunday 2 August.

“This scheme will improve the busy section of road on the A701 for local residents, commercial businesses and motorists for years to come.

“Motorists can keep up to date with real time traffic information by visiting www.trafficscotland.org or following @TrafficScotland on Twitter. Advanced warning signs will also be in place on the approach to inform motorists that roadworks are taking place.”

– Gordon Wilson, contract director for Scotland TranServ

WATCH: Attracting Chinese visitors to Cumbria

Yan Li and Zhiling Lou are producing a report on Chinese attitudes to overseas travel and tourism Credit: ITV Border

Lake District businesses have enlisted the help of two Chinese students from Lancaster University to produce a report on Chinese attitudes to overseas travel and tourism.

The aim of the study is to lure more Chinese tourists to Cumbria. Katie Hunter reports.

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£1.9m Maryport rail hub plans go on show

Credit: Press Association

Plans for a new £1.9million rail hub in Maryport are going on public display today.

The Maryport Rail Station Hub project aims to encourage sustainable travel along the Cumbrian Coast and improve access to both Maryport Station and the Cumbrian Coast Railway.

The scheme will provide a new 78-space car park located on land currently owned by the Maryport Amateur Rugby Football League Club (ARFLC) and would require the building of a new access road on to Mealpot Road and the relocation of a Multi-Use Games Area (MUGA).

Improvements to pedestrian and cycle links to the station are also proposed alongside new drop-off facilities, blue badge parking and a footway along Mealpot Road.

The relocated MUGA will be built on the former tennis courts close to the A594 and will bring a currently disused piece of land back into use, with a new games area built to modern standards.

As part of the Cumbria Growth Deal secured by Cumbria Local Enterprise Partnership, £1.9m has been set aside to deliver the improvements and create the new ‘hub’.

The drop-in session is being held at the Maryport ARFLC today between 3pm and 7pm and provides an opportunity for people to express their views on the proposals.

Plans will be displayed and members of the project team will be available to answer questions. The drop-in session precedes the submission of a planning application for the scheme, with construction expected in 2016.

“People will be able to find out more information about this scheme and view design plans at the drop-in session, so I would encourage local people to come along and see for themselves how we’re proposing to improve access to the station.”

– Cllr Keith Little, Cumbria County Council Cabinet member for transpor

Drainage improvements on major Cumbrian road

Flooding on the section of the A66 where work is taking place to improve drainage Credit: Highways England

A project to upgrade drainage on a stretch of the A66 near Penrith is due to start on Wednesday.

The month-long Highways England scheme will tackle flooding issues on the section of the road near Whinfell Park, around three miles east of the town.

The majority of the work will be carried out overnight although a temporary 40mph speed limit will be in place at all times of day for the safety of drivers. During night work (between 8pm and 6am) temporary traffic lights are going to be in use. Drivers may also be led through the roadworks in 10mph convoys on some occasions.

“The ditch next to the A66 is prone to becoming blocked which causes it to flood and leaves water on the road.

“We’ll be installing a new drainage system which should prevent this from happening again in the future, but we’ll need to have a temporary speed limit in place so the work can be carried out safely.

“The project will improve safety for drivers as it will reduce the risk of flooding on this stretch of road.”

– Peter Gee, Project Manager at Highways England

Cumbrian climber scaling 4,000ft sheer granite cliff face

Leo Houlding starting out on the Mirror Wall Credit: Leo Houlding / Berghaus

Cumbrian climber Leo Houlding has started an attempted first ascent of one of the highest rock climbs in the world.

Greenland's Mirror Wall Credit: Leo Houlding / Berghaus

The Mirror Wall in Greenland is 1,200m (4,000ft) of sheer granite cliff face - making it almost four times higher than London's Shard. It's also 1,000ft taller than the Dawn Wall of El Capitan, which made the news this year when two American climbers made it to the top.

Scale image showing height of the Mirror Wall Credit: Leo Houlding / Berghaus

Leo Houlding and his team of three other climbers were dropped off by helicopter as the warm July weather is melting the glacier surrounding the Mirror Wall.

It means the wall is free of ice but it made their trek to the foot of the wall more dangerous.

Helicopter drops of the climbers and their supplies Credit: Leo Houlding / Berghaus

Back home in Cumbria, climber Adam Hocking is awaiting news with interest.

"They'll probably rig the first 10 rope lengths from the ground and abseil back down and make their way to base camp, get everything ready and then once they've achieved that then they'll take their ledges, their sleeping ledges - the portaledges - and then start actually trying to force their way up the mountain, up the sheer face.

"Leo is a very experienced big wall climber, he's climbed some amazing cliffs all over the world and Leo is on this kind of mission looking for a 1,000m cliff, and this is one of the only ones, the last bastions of adventure really so hopefully he'll manage it and do Cumbria proud."

– ADAM HOCKING, CLIMBER FROM KESWICK
Adam Hocking Credit: ITV Border

Communications are patchy but Leo has managed to send back a few photos and a comment on what they've seen so far.

“There are precious few cliffs in the world that exceed 1,000m in vertical Height, but right in front of us, in this little explored corner of Greenland, lies one such beauty.

"The Mirror Wall is immaculate, a beautiful tombstone of glass smooth granite, set in this pristine but harsh Arctic wilderness. We have spied a devious line right up the centre of the tallest, steepest part of the face and are all really motivated to get up there."

– Leo Houlding
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