Nicola Adams is back in Leeds and has been thrilling the crowds around her golden postboxes

Put 'em up! Nicola delights the crowds in Leeds Photo: Calendar news

Olympic golden girl Nicola Adams returned to her home city of Leeds today and insisted her new-found fame will not affect her determination to continue to dominate her sport in the years ahead.

Adams, who fought for years for funding and publicity as one of women's boxing's few standard bearers, has enjoyed every minute of a non-stop media whirl since making history in London less than two weeks ago.

Her seemingly endless list of media engagements since her victory have included appearances on the Alan Carr Show and Channel Four's 'Sunday Brunch' - as well as a swift visit to the mandatory golden postbox in her home city centre.

Adams told the Press Association: "I'm going to enjoy every moment but nothing is going to change me. I've been boxing since I was 12 years old and there isn't anything that can get in the way of that.

"I dragged myself out of bed with a broken back to get back in the gym so I could go to the Olympics, so I can definitely cope with fame. After being stuck in a bed in pain for four months, everything else is easy."

Even as she reaps her deserved rewards from her gold medal triumph over China's Cancan Ren, Adams' thoughts are already turning back to her beloved sport and a return to the gym in Sheffield next month.

"I will get back to doing a little bit of training soon and go back to the camp in a month or so," said Adams. "I've had a lot of tough bouts this year so I deserve to have a little rest.

"I've got the European Championships next year when I'll be looking forward to defending my title, and I still don't have a gold medal from the World Championships. So I still feel like I've got something left to prove."

For many who were witness to Adams' struggle to overcome a crippling back injury in 2009 before going on to make history as the first women's Olympic boxing champion, the acclaim she is now afforded seems only natural.

And while Adams says that while she finds the extent of the adulation "surreal", she maintains she is intent on soaking up every moment as a reward for the battles she had to endure to order to realise her dream.

Adams added: "I thought there was going to be a bit of excitement when I won but I didn't think I was going to touch the nation. It was such a shock to me in the days after I won.

"I guess the public could see that I'd just gone out there to enjoy every moment. You could hardly have made up my story, and just being at the Olympics was an achievement in itself. I tried to treat everything else as a bonus.

"I've already had people tell me I'm their hero and I've inspired them to box. It's great to think girls might take up the sport because of me. It's a great sport, and it's an honour that people are looking up to me that way."