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Major new Henry Moore exhibition at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966–69. Photo © Jonty Wilde. Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation.

The Yorkshire Sculpture Park is to host a major exhibition of work by Henry Moore. More than 120 works will be on display exploring the artist's relationship with the land.

Henry Moore was born into a mining family in Castleford and was a founding patron of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. He was committed to showing his work in the open air, in particular at among the rolling hills of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park's former Deer Park.

Benefit system to blame for hungry children, says child poverty group

A group which campaigns against child poverty says the benefit system is to blame for children going to school hungry.

A report released today says almost half of teachers across Yorkshire and north Lincolnshire say they are bringing in food for children to eat in the morning.

Imran Hussain from the Child Poverty Action Group told Calendar why he thinks the trend exists:

Calls for subsidised breakfast clubs

There are calls today for subsidised breakfast clubs in schools after it emerged that some teachers are bringing food in to school to feed pupils.

A report found that a fifth of teachers say they've seen a rise in number of children arriving at class hungry while seven in ten claim children who don't eat first thing find it harder to learn.

Jill Rutter from the Family and Childcare Trust says schools should provide breakfasts:

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Teachers resort to 'bringing in food for pupils' says report

Almost half of teachers across Yorkshire and north Lincolnshire say they are bringing in food for children to eat in the morning, according to a study.

Teachers are bringing in food according to this study Credit: PA

Meanwhile figures for the East Midlands, which includes Lincolnshire, show four in ten teachers say not eating first thing makes pupils more disruptive. Over sixty percent claim it makes them unable to learn.

Teaching assistant spared jail after bullying campaign

A primary school teaching assistant from Calderdale who waged a five month campaign of bullying against a vulnerable seven-year-old girl has been spared jail by a judge who described her behaviour as shameful.

Rachael Regan left the girl in tears after she taped her to a chair with sticky tape as classmates laughed, and other occasions shut her in a storeroom and even ripped up her photograph. Jon Hill reports.

Bullying classroom assistant spared jail

A teaching assistant from Calderdale who waged a five month campaign of bullying against a vulnerable seven-year-old girl, taping her to a chair and putting her in a store room has been spared jail by a judge.

Rachael Regan, 43, Credit: Press Association

Rachael Regan, 43, from Illingworth, in Halifax was found guilty of child cruelty last month.

Today a judge at Bradford Crown Court sentenced her to carry out 40 hours unpaid community work. She is also barred from working with children.

Judge Neil Davey, QC described Regan's behaviour as "shameful." The trial jury was told that the girl, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was left crying after being taped to a chair in front of laughing classmates and being shut in a cupboard. Regan also stuck Post-it notes to the child’s thumb to stop her from sucking it.

Regan’s catalogue of cruelty against the pupil, now aged nine, included tying her shoes round her feet, calling her names, “goading” her for not completing work, hiding her doll and tearing up her photograph.

Judge Davey said the girl was now "back to her old, happy, bubbly, extrovert self" since the bullying which happened in 2012.

He told Regan, who had denied one charge of child cruelty, "having humiliated (the girl) you have already been professionally humiliated, now you've been publicly humiliated."

Regan left court without comment.

The class teacher Deborah McDonald, 41, from Halifax, was cleared of the same offence by a jury last month.

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