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Six-year-old Sam protests over drug funding at Westminster

People with ultra rare genetic diseases have protested at Westminster in their continuing campaign to try and persuade the health service to keep funding a drug which could change their lives.

They include six-year-old Sam Brown, from Otley, who has Morquio Syndrome.

It is a rare condition that means his skeleton does not grow properly, but his internal organs do.

Sam has been receiving a drug called Vimizin that helps him live a normal life.

It is expensive but it had been provided free by the drug company which produces it.

However, that deal is coming to an end.

Jon Hill reports:

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Yorkshire Cancer Research reveals £5m projects

Projects for diagnosing, treating and caring for cancer patients across Yorkshire are to get a major funding boost.

It's been announced that Yorkshire Cancer Research, based in Harrogate, is to invest £5 million in nine projects to address what the charity describes as a North-South divide in cancer outcomes.

We're extremely proud to be funding such vital research in Yorkshire thanks to the generosity of our supporters.

This is a very substantial investment in projects with a huge regional significance which will take us one step closer to reducing the devastating impact of cancer on people who live in Yorkshire."

– Charles Rowett, Chief Executive Yorkshire Cancer Research

As part of the funding the charity will invest £1.5m in a five-year project aimed at improving the survival of bowel cancer patients through better quality surgery, radiology and pathology.

Cancer charity to invest millions in research projects

Projects for diagnosing, treating and caring for cancer patients across Yorkshire are to get a major funding boost today.

Credit: Press Association

It has been announced that the Yorkshire Cancer Research is to invest £5 million in nine projects in a bid to address what the charity describes as a north-south divide in cancer outcomes.

Projects at the universities of Sheffield and Leeds are among those to benefit from funding.

We're extremely proud to be funding such vital research in Yorkshire thanks to the generosity of our supporters. This is a very substantial investment in projects with a huge regional significance which will take us one step closer to reducing the devastating impact of cancer on people who live in Yorkshire.

– Charles Rowett, Chief Executive Officer at Yorkshire Cancer Research

The charity will invest £1.5m in a five-year project aimed at improving the survival of bowel cancer patients through better quality surgery, radiology and pathology. An additional £1.5m will be invested in a phase III clinical trial in Leeds involving cancer patients from Yorkshire.

A clinical trial involving patients at the University of Sheffield will evaluate the best way to treat aggressive bladder cancer when found at an early stage.

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