Jamie's lasting legacy

A little boy from York who lost his battle with cancer has left a huge legacy.

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Report published into abuse at Doncaster day care centre

A catalogue of falings has been revealed today after a long awaited report into abuse at a Doncaster day care centre was finally published.

The serious case review into abuse of severely disabled people at the Solar Centre highlights failings in South Yorkshire police, the Crown Prosecution Service and the NHS Trust responsible for the centre.

It says lessons must be learned from what happened, and all have now apologised to the families of those abused.

Martin Fisher reports:

Read: Agencies blasted for lack of co-operation by Serious Case Review

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Agencies blasted for lack of co-operation by Serious Case Review

A Serious Case Review into what went wrong at a care centre where severely disabled patients were slapped and mistreated has found different agencies should have worked together better.

Doncaster Safeguarding Adults Partnership Board (DSAPB) published an independent report into abuse at the Solar Centre perpetrated by care assistants James Hinds and Susan Murphy between 2005 and 2007.

The couple were handed jail sentences of two years and nine months at Sheffield Crown Court last year.

They were convicted of ill-treating 12 different outpatients between them and the judge said it was "impossible to assess the upset, distress and bewilderment" they caused.

A report commissioned by DSAPB and written by Gill Poole reviewed what happened at the centre run by Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Foundation Trust.

The report makes nine recommendations, one of which was apologising to the families of victims for the length of time it had taken to conclude.

First of all and most importantly, I would like to sincerely apologise on behalf of the Doncaster Safeguarding Adults Partnership Board to the victims and families in this case for the amount of time it has taken to reach this point and for this report to be concluded.

There are lessons to be learned from this case and agencies should have worked better together at the time. It will be little comfort to those victims and families to hear that in Doncaster, things have changed for the better since this case and we do work more effectively together and have people at the heart of what we do especially in safeguarding. I do want to stress that.

That said, the report does recognise that agencies could have done things more expediently and in a more coordinated way. The independent author has made recommendations and we will ensure they are actioned."

– Roger Thompson, DSAPB chair

The report makes nine recommendations, one of which was apologising to the families of victims for the length of time it had taken to conclude.

Report out today into Solar Centre mistreatment

A report into the abuse of severely disabled patients by some staff at the Solar Centre at St Catherine's Hospital in Doncaster will be published later today.

The report follows a serious case review which was ordered after the jailing last year of care assistants James Hinds and Susan Murphy for mistreating patients in their care.

Trust out of special measures but still receiving support

A hospital trust criticised for its high death rates has improved, but still needs to improve further, according to inspectors.

The organisation which runs hospitals in Scunthorpe, Goole and Grimsby is being recommended to be taken out of special measures following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

The CQC says the trust will receive ongoing support to ensure its performance continues to improve.

Chris Kiddey reports

Father warns against loom-bands craze

The latest craze to hit the classroom is loom bands - with children across the world making millions of them every day.

A dress made of the small coloured elastic bands sold for a staggering £170,000 pounds earlier this week.

But now a father from North Yorkshire has warned parents to be extra vigilant after he checked on his son - who went to sleep wearing them - and his fingers had turned black.

Helen Steel reports:

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Mother of still born baby hopes hospital will learn lessons

A mother whose first child was stillborn three years ago, says she hopes lessons will be learned after the hospital involved admitted liability.

24-year-old April Hall from Bradford says her baby's heart rate was not properly monitored, and had her child been delivered 15 minutes earlier, he may be alive today.

The trust which runs Bradford Royal Infirmary has offered compensation, but says staff did everything expected of them. Emma Wilkinson reports:

Bradford hospital admits liability after still birth

A woman from Bradford, whose first child died at birth, says she hopes lessons have been learned after the hospital involved admitted liability.

As April Hall gave birth to son Ethan three years ago, his heart slowed down and he was still born. April and her solicitors claimed that staff missed vital signs and had he been delivered earlier, he would've survived.

The trust which runs Bradford Royal Infirmary today reiterated its condolences and said staff did everything that was expected of them, within nationally accepted practices.

But April says it has been a difficult process:

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