HS2 maps 'are old'

The MP for Chesterfield, Toby Perkins has dubbed the decision over where to build the high speed rail link 'amateurish'. It's after claims the maps used to choose the route were out of date.

Residents claim house sales fallen through

Residents who claim to be prisoners in their own homes since the High speed rail route was announced, are demanding the Government brings forward the consultation process.

The group from Swillington, Oulton and Woodlesford say their house prices have plummeted and sales have fallen through since the announcement was made. No formal consultation has been planned until later this year.

Now Leeds City Council is hoping to meet with the people behind HS2 to discuss the problems. Here's Councillor Richard Lewis.

Canal Trust demands discussions with HS2 officials

Chesterfield Canal Trust says it 'welcomes' news that discussions have been taking place between HS2 Ltd. and local authorities over the route of the new line between London and Leeds, but has warned the proposals 'serve to blight' further regeneration of the waterway.

It comes after concerns were raised over the impact the line would have on the 300-year-old canal and amid claims the route was drawn up using out of date maps.

HS2 Ltd. said the route is 'the Government's initial preferred route' and it is now able to 'address concerns about specific sites'.

Members of the Trust have now requested discussions with HS2 officials before a full public consultation is launched later this year.

The Chesterfield Canal Trust very much welcomes HS2 discussions with Chesterfield Borough Council. The issues raised by the proposals for HS2, however, go well beyond the boundaries of Chesterfield Borough.

We regret that the proposals serve to blight, at one fell swoop, half a billion pounds of regeneration work associated with the Chesterfield Canal regeneration area; they devalue hundreds of thousands of hours of volunteer work put in over a thirty year period, and potentially trash years of partnership restoration planning and delivery.

– Chesterfield Canal Trust Ltd.

Advertisement

Confusion over HS2 plans

There are fears that officials who drew up the HS2 route between London and Leeds may have done it on maps that are out of date.

It's been claimed a waterways project in North Derbyshire which was completed more than a year ago is missing from the HS2 route map released last month.

The group that spotted the mistake is calling for talks with the Government. Ben Erlam reports.

HS2 Ltd: We are now able to address concerns

Officials planning the route the high speed rail line between London and Leeds have said they are 'now able to address concerns about specific sites' amid fears the route jeopardise further restoration of the Chesterfield Canal.

"The route north of Birmingham that was recently published is the Government’s initial preferred route and we are now able to address concerns about specific sites such as the Chesterfield canal in more detail with local authorities.

We have recently met with Chesterfield council and discussions will continue.

A full public consultation will also open later this year and information gathered through the consultation will help inform the decision on the final route, which will include how the line can cross existing infrastructure such as canals."

– Ian Jordan, HS2 Ltd

Video: HS2 'mistake is amateurish'

The MP for Chesterfield, Toby Perkins has dubbed the decision over where to build the high speed rail link 'amateurish'. It's after claims the maps used to choose the route were out of date.

The track, which links London to Leeds cuts across parts of Chesterfield canal.

But documents regarding the construction of the link, which were submitted to the government in March 2012, included maps which are missing nearby Staveley Basin which was built more than a year ago.

Video: HS2 maps 'out of date'

It's claimed the maps used to draw up the route for the new high speed rail link could be out of date.

The track, which links London to Leeds, cuts over stretches of the Chesterfield Canal.

But documents regarding the construction of the link, which were submitted to the government in March 2012, failed to include Staveley Town Basin that was completed more than a year ago.

It has also been claimed a 600 metre stretch of restored waterway is missing from the map.

Robin Stonebridge is from the Chesterfield Canal Trust.

Advertisement