NHS boss awarded 25K pay rise

It has been revealed the boss of an under fire NHS trust has had her salary increased to £170,000 a year.

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VIDEO: £25k pay rise for boss of failing NHS trust

The boss of a failing health trust has been given a massive pay rise - meaning she now earns more than the Prime Minister.

It emerged today that Karen Jackson's pay packet for running the Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which was placed in special measures last month, has been increased by 25 thousand pounds.

The rise has been attacked by the taxpayers alliance but her trust chairman says she's worth it.

Nurses hit out at pay rise for NHS trust boss

The Royal College of nursing have commented on the pay rise awarded to an NHS boss at a struggling health trust.

"Nurses and health care assistants have had a two-year pay freeze since 2011 and have been awarded just 1% for this year and next. They are struggling to keep their heads above water financially, as their pay levels fail to keep pace with inflation. I'm sure RCN members will be shocked that the trust has rewarded its chief executive with a massive pay increase. It appears that there is one rule for the front line and another rule for the boardroom."

– The Royal College of Nursing

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NHS boss of struggling trust awarded pay rise

It has been revealed the boss of an under fire NHS trust has had her salary increased to £170,000 a year. Karen Jackson, the chief executive of Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, earned £145,000 in the autumn of 2010 but that figure went up by £25,000 last April.

The salary increase means she is now paid more than the Prime Minister. The trust has come in for criticism in recent months. The trust was one of several told to improve the standard of patient care. In a statement released to Calendar, the trust said:

“The remuneration committee is responsible for agreeing the executive management team’s salary bands and uses a national system to determine its decisions on pay. The bands are reviewed every year and a variety of factors are taken into account, such as comparative salaries in the NHS, individual performance, and market forces."

– Dr James Whittingham, chair of the trust
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