Live updates

Terrifying Everest crevasse climb

A young mountaineer from Lincolnshire has returned home after becoming one of the youngest British climbers to reach the top of Mount Everest. Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton from Sleaford reached the summit earlier this month.

One of the most nerve-wracking moments of the climb involved Matthew walking across two ladders, tied together, to get beyond a crevasse. He strapped his video camera to his chest as he walked across.

Advertisement

Climber reaches Everest summit

Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton on top of Mount Everest Credit: Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton

Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton is seen here at the summit of Mount Everest earlier this month, just hours before three other climbers died on the mountain.

Mountains in the Himalayas Credit: Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton
Matthew (right) with one of the team who helped him on the climb. Credit: Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton

Mountaineer back home after conquering Everest

A young mountaineer from Lincolnshire is now back home after a two month mission that took him, literally, to the top of the world. Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton reached the summit of Mount Everest in the early hours of Saturday 19 May.

During the climb the 22 year old had to overcome laryngitis and temporarily running out of oxygen just short of the summit. He wanted to take on the challenge to raise money for the international charity Global Angels which provides safe drinking water for disadvantaged children.

Advertisement

Mountaineer reaches Everest base camp

A young mountaineer from Lincolnshire who is aiming to become one of the youngest British climbers to reach the top of Mount Everest has now made it to the base camp. It will now take Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton from Sleaford several more weeks to reach the summit.

The 21 year old decided to take on the challenge to raise money for disadvantaged children and help raise awareness of the problems associated with climate change. He will spend around 70 days following the south-eastern route up the 8848 metre high mountain taken by Sir Edmund Hillary in 1953.

He has now taken part in a traditional three-hour Puja ceremony where Sherpas pray to the gods for permission to climb the mountain and ask for a safe and successful expedition. Flags are hung around the camp and readings and chants are recited from a prayer book.

It is great to be at Everest Base Camp amidst the most wonderful sight of the most difficult climb before us. My kit has finally arrived from Katmandu but I would hate to start wearing some clean pants at such an early stage in the expedition! We are all eating and more importantly remaining hydrated as the effects of altitude are forever present. As I cope with symptoms, at the moment headaches and sleepless nights, I must remember one has to be patient and allow the body to adjust, even if that does mean rest, as you know your body will allow you to climb when you are ready.

– Matthew Dieumegard-Thornton