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Calls for Richard III consultation rejected

Today three judges ruled that is where they should remain and it was "time for King Richard III to be given a dignified reburial, and finally laid to rest".

The judges rejected a bid by relatives who make up the Plantagenet Alliance for a ruling that Mr Grayling is under a legal duty to set up a wide-ranging public consultation exercise to decide where the king's final resting place should be.

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Calls for coroner's inquiry over Richard III bones doubts

Fresh doubt has been raised over the bones of Richard the Third.

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Two leading academics have called for a coroner's style inquiry as they claim the bones could be those of any of the King's descendants.

They say the DNA evidence is not enough to be able to say for sure. Leicester University, who found the bones, say they're still confident it's him.

Richard III's relatives made wait for decision

Distant relatives of King Richard III will have to wait to learn whether they have won their High Court battle with Justice Secretary Chris Grayling over where the monarch's recently-discovered remains should be reburied.

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In an unprecedented legal battle, relatives who make up the Plantagenet Alliance asked three judges to rule that Mr Grayling is under a legal duty to set up a wide-ranging public consultation exercise to decide the question.

Their counsel Gerard Clarke argued the Queen and royal household should be at the top of the list of consultees, and it should include the distant relatives themselves as well as general members of the public.

Mr Clarke said the issue was important as the last English king to die in battle "is not just any old bones".

Richard III

Government QC James Eadie told the court Mr Grayling was "under no statutory or common law duty to consult".

Lady Justice Hallett, sitting with Mr Justice Ouseley and Mr Justice Haddon-Cave, said the court would take time to consider its judgment and told the parties: "We shall let you know our decision as soon as possible."

Richard's battle-scarred bones were discovered under a council car park in Leicester and the current plan is for them to be reinterred at the city's cathedral.

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Richard was killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 - ending the Wars of the Roses and the Plantagenet dynasty - and his body was taken to Leicester by supporters of the victorious Henry VII and buried in Greyfriars church, now the site of the council car park.

The Plantagenet Alliance want the remains to be buried at York Minster, claiming that was the wish "of the last medieval king of England", who was known as Richard of York.

Mr Clarke said in a two-day hearing the alliance would be satisfied with a wide-ranging public consultation exercise on where the king's final resting place should be.

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Court ruling due on Richard III burial site

Richard III's battle-scarred remains were found under a council car park in Leicestershire. Credit: PA

Judges at the High Court in London are due to rule today on where the remains of Richard III will be buried.

Campaigners from York, who want them brought to the city, sought a judicial review to overturn a decision for the remains to be laid to rest in Leicester.

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Richard III's descendants call for public consultation on burial site

Richard III's remains. Credit: PA

Descendants of Richard III are calling for a public consultation to determine where his remains should be buried.

The relatives of the monarch are asking judges at the High Court in London to rule that Justice Secretary Chris Grayling is under a legal duty to allow a consultation.

Richard III’s battle-scarred bones were discovered under a council car park in Leicester and the current plan is for them to be reinterred at the city's cathedral.

The Plantagenet Alliance Ltd, formed by the distant relatives, want the remains to be buried at York Minster. They claim that is what Richard III, who was from the House of York, would have wanted.

Leicester's actions over king's remains 'inexplicable'

The Plantagenet Alliance Ltd, formed by the distant relatives of King Richard III, are fighting for the late monarch's remains to be buried at York Minster, claiming it was the king's wish.

They are bringing judicial review proceedings against Justice Secretary Chris Grayling, the University of Leicester - which intends to bury the remains at Leicester Cathedral - and Leicester City Council.

Their solicitor, Matthew Howarth, from law firm Gordons, said:

Quite why our opponents have declined the obviously sensible option of independent adjudication, preferring to incur substantial legal costs - including for the taxpayer - and tie up considerable court time, is inexplicable.

Although many people are astonished we've got this far, we'll go to the hearing with every confidence in our position, intending to state our case clearly and believing there's every chance the licence will be quashed.

If that happens, the odds about the king eventually being laid to rest in York will shorten dramatically.

At the heart of the case is a Ministry of Justice decision to grant a "section 25 licence" under the Burial Act giving archaeologists from the university licence to excavate, and the university permission to decide where to re-bury the bones, which were exhumed in the city 19 months ago.

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Ministry of Justice 'disappointed' in Richard III row

Richard III campaigners will march through York to raise awareness of plans to bury his remains in Leicester. It comes before the Judicial Review on the 13 and 14 March. King Richard's 16th great-niece, spokesperson for the Plantagenet Alliance, is leading the campaign to return his remains to York.

The Ministry of Justice commented to express disappointment with the permission to challenge them.

"The exhumation licence was granted by the Ministry of Justice following due process. We are disappointed that permission was granted to the Plantagenet Alliance Limited to challenge the licence. We are defending our position at the judicial review hearing."

– The Ministry of Justice
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