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Plantagenet Alliance march through York ahead of Judicial Review

ITV Yorkshire

The Plantagenet Alliance have marched through York to raise the profile of their bid to bring Richard III's bones for burial in York. The march comes ahead of a Judicial Review, due to start in London tomorrow.

Vanessa Roe, Richard III's 16th great neice at the rally

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Walking with Richard III tours set for York

Image of Richard III

City of York Council’s Archaeologist will be leading a series of walks

retracing Richard III’s steps around York, this Spring.

The walking tours are open to the public, and have been devised by

John Oxley FSA in response to public interest in the identification of the

monarch’s remains and as part of the collaborative Richard III: Rumour

and Reality project.

This series of walks were fully booked out last Autumn and, as planned,

are being run again.

Councillor Sonja Crisp, Cabinet Member for Leisure, Culture and

Tourism, said: “In addition to his professional expertise, John is a

fantastic story teller and these walks should be essential for anyone

interested in the history, archaeology and culture of 15th and early 16th

century York.

Richard III scientists to look at diseases

The remains of Richard III are to be the first to have their entire genetic code sequenced.

Scientists want to map the king's DNA before his remains and any samples taken from them are reinterred.

Today Dr Turi King from Leicester University said she hoped to find out more about the monarch's susceptibility to certain diseases:

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High Court battle over Richard III reburial adjourned

The legal battle over where the remains of Richard III will be buried has been adjourned.

Three High Court judges decided to adjourn the case to a later date because another party had joined the legal confrontation.

A model of the head of Richard III Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire

The remains of the last Plantagenet King were found buried under a car park in Leicester last year, and the plan was for them to be reinterred in a tomb in Leicester Cathedral.

But distant relatives of the King in York have brought a legal challenge to this decision. The Plantagenet Alliance claim the remains should be reburied at York Minister, as he wished.

The legal challenge consists of concerns that the Justice Secretary failed to consult before giving archaeologists at the University of Leicester license to excavate Richard’s body, and decide where he would be reburied.

Now the case has been adjourned so that Leicester City Council can be added to the list of parties being challenged by the York group.

Read more: Petition to keep Richard III in Leicester gets more than 34,000 signatures

King Richard III: Decision to bury in Leicester reviewed

Reconstruction of Richard III's head

The battle to decide where the remains of Richard III are to be buried goes to the High Court today.

The full judicial review hearing about whether the exhuming and reinterring of Richard III's remains should be allowed takes place at London's High Court.

Involving two judges and expected to last a whole day, the hearing will specifically examine the Ministry of Justice's decision to grant a "section 25 licence" to the University of Leicester.

This authorised the university to remove the king's remains from beneath a council car park and reinter them. The university subsequently announced it intended the reburial would take place in Leicester Cathedral.

A group of the king's descendants, known as Plantagenet Alliance Limited, which wants his final resting place to be York, has brought Tuesday's case in an effort to have the "section 25 licence" quashed.

Plantagenet Alliance cost recovery capped

The judge also, in a quid pro quo for granting a full PCO, capped the costs the Alliance can recover from the Justice Secretary and the University of Leicester, the second defendant in the case, at £70,000.

The Alliance had suggested the cap should be dramatically increased by 50% to reflect the Justice secretary's "aggravating" conduct, including his public criticism of the proceedings going to court in the media.

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