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Ejector seat manufacturer in court over death of Red Arrows pilot

Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham

An ejector seat manufacturer has appeared in court charged with breaching the Health and Safety at Work Act over the death of a Red Arrows pilot.

The charge relates to the death of Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham at RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, in 2011.

Martin Baker Aircraft Company Ltd, of Lower Road, Higher Denham, near Uxbridge, Buckinghamshire, made no indication of plea at Lincoln Magistrates' Court.

The case will be next heard at Lincoln Crown Court in February.

Members of Flt Lt Cunningham's family were in attendance at court during the brief hearing.

The experienced pilot and Iraq war veteran died after his ejector seat initiated during the pre-flight checks of his Hawk XX177 jet while on the ground and stationary at the Lincolnshire airbase, the Health and Safety Executive said.

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Tunisian gunman's route digitally reconstructed in court

Seifeddine Rezgui was dropped off at the beach by a white Peugeot van. Credit: Darko Vojinovic / AP

The Tunisian gunman's route - said to be approximately 2.9km from the point he was dropped off to the point he was killed - was digitally reconstructed and shown to the inquest into the beach massacre.

Pictures of the 38 victims appeared in the locations where they were shot.

Mobile phone footage of part of the attack recorded by a Tunisian witness was shown, and the clip featured loud gunshots, shouting, and people running in panic.

Part of the clip - which captured bodies - was pixellated, and it featured the sounds of more gunfire towards the end.

Another clip, described as "very graphic" by Ms Leek, showed the gunman's body lying face down on a road with blood on the ground beside him after he was shot.

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Speedboat driver tried to confront Tunisia attack gunman

Attacker Seifeddine Rezgui killed 20 people on the beach at Sousse, eight inside the hotel and 10 on the hotel grounds. Credit: AP

The inquest into the Tunisia beach massacre has been shown CCTV and heard more details of the gun attack, including how reports of a second gunman may have been sparked by a speedboat driver who tried to confront attacker Seifeddine Rezgui.

Rezgui had thrown a grenade at an armed guard who opened fire on him as the extremist entered the Imperial Marhaba hotel from the beach with an automatic weapon, the hearing at London's Royal Courts of Justice was told.

Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest, said the guard fell to the ground "seemingly unconscious" at which point the local speedboat driver, named as AI, picked his gun up and attempted to confront Rezgui but could not work the weapon as the attacker continued to claim a total of 38 lives.

Ms Leek said Rezgui was thought to have acted alone on the beach having been dropped off by an accomplice.

The inquest was shown CCTV of a white Peugeot van dropping the gunman off then driving away before Rezgui - hiding his weapon in a parasol - opened fire.

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Tunisian security 'delayed their arrival' at attack hotel

Local investigators criticised police for a slow response to the killing in front of the five-star Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel. Credit: PA

Tunisian police "deliberately and unjustifiably" delayed their arrival to the scene of the Sousse terrorist attack in which 30 Britons were killed, the inquest into the June 2015 massacre has heard.

Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest, said a report by Tunisian Judge Akremi had identified failings by local units that could have ended the slaughter earlier.

Police arrived and shot extremist Seifeddine Rezgui Yacoubi dead after he had claimed the lives of 38 tourists on the beach outside the five-star Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel.

The hearing packed with relatives of the victims at the Royal Courts of Justice in London heard an unnamed interior minister had told the judge some Tunisian security officers stalled on purpose.

He said the units that should have intervened in the events deliberately and unjustifiably slowed down to delay their arrival at the hotel.

They had the ability to put an end to the attack before the police arrived but wasted a considerable amount of time in getting to the hotel.

– Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest
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Minute's silence held at reopening of Tunisia inquest

A minute's silence has been held at the reopening of the inquest into the Tunisia terror attacks.

Thirty-eight people were killed when terrorist Seifeddine Rezgui opened fire in the popular resort of Port El Kantaoui, Sousse, in June 2015.

The hearing will examine what happened to the 30 Britons who died in the atrocities.

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Relatives arrive for 'answers' over Tunisia beach massacre

The grieving family of attack victims Janet and John Stocker have said they are 'looking for answers' at the inquest. Credit: PA

The families of 30 British tourists killed in 2015's terrorist attack on a beach in Tunisia have arrived at London's Royal Courts of Justice for the inquest into their deaths.

The inquest will attempt to determine how much the UK government and travel firms knew about the risk of an attack on tourists holidaying in the area.

Some 38 people were killed when Islamist gunman Seifeddine Rezgui opened fire in the popular resort of Port El Kantaoui, Sousse, in June 2015.

The terrorist attack in Sousse remains the deadliest on British citizens since the July 7 London bombings in 2005. Credit: PA
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