Live updates

Work planned for Selby rail bridge

Network Rail will begin significant refurbishment on Selby's rail swing bridge this summer.

The work means many services to and from Hull will be disrupted between 26 July and 8 September.

Engineers will refurbish the structure itself and the hydraulics on the swing span during the project.

We’re investing £8m on steelwork repairs, work to the hydraulics on the swing span, waybeam replacements and wholesale grit blasting and painting of the entire structure. Once the work is completed the structure should be maintenance free for 25 years and we will be able to run trains at line speed, removing a speed restriction. I thank passengers for their patience while we complete these essential works.

– Phil Verster. Network Rail

Advertisement

Proposals made for electrification of Hull's railway

A delegation of MPs, councillors and business groups has met with Transport Secretary to make a case for the electrification of the rail line between Selby and Hull.

A financial plan using public and private money has been made and the cross party group of politicians is pushing for the work to be done in time for Hull's year as UK City of Culture in 2017.

Hull rail talks

A delegation of local councillors and MPs are travelling to London later to meet the Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughnlin.

They are to discuss plans to electrify Hull's railway network.

It's proposed to electrify the line from Selby to Hull in a £94m scheme.

Advertisement

Major rail operation underway to shift landslip

A massive engineering operation is underway to shift over one hundred thousand tonnes of soil that's threatening to engulf one of the busiest rail lines in our region.

One of the tracks on the line linking Sheffield with London is closed at Unstone just north of Chesterfield because it's too unstable to use. It's believed recent heavy rain is to blame for the landslip. Martin Fisher has been to see the damage.

Report: Economic benefits of HS2

The government came out fighting today in its campaign to win over those who doubt the benefits of the revolutionary high speed rail link from London to the north.

The Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin said the £40 billion scheme would be a "heart bypass for the clogged arteries" of Britain's transport system.

But many aren't so sure that towns and cities here will benefit from HS2 - including those who'll live nearest to the track.

Chris Kiddey reports.

Campaigners question the benefits of HS2

James Lynch from the So What campaign group

The government has come out fighting in its campaign to win over those who doubt the benefits of the new planned high speed rail link from London to Yorkshire.

The Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin said the forty billion pound scheme would be a "heart bypass for the clogged arteries" of Britain's transport system.

But many of those who heard his words still aren't so sure that towns and cities here in the north will benefit from HS2 - particularly those who'll live nearest to the track.

Load more updates