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UNISON calls for 'wealthier to contribute more via tax'

Britain's top earners should "contribute a little bit more" so public sector workers can have "decent pay", the head of a trade union told Good Morning Britain.

Dave Prentis dismissed Francis Maude's claims the Government could not afford a pay rise and said, "the top 1% have increased their wealth by 18% in the last year - can't just we ask that they contribute a little bit more, via the taxation system, to enable us to have decent pay?"

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Govt: Pay rises will lead to 'larger debts for our children'

If public sector workers are given a bigger pay rise than the 1% promised by the Government, it will lead to "debts ever larger for our children and our grandchildren to have to pay off", a senior minister said.

Francis Maude told Good Morning Britain "pay restraint is essential" if the UK ever wants to get its deficit down.

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David Cameron: 'Time has come' to tackle strike laws

David Cameron said the "time had come" to tighten strike laws and vowed to include this measure in the Conservative manifesto ahead of next year's General Election.

Prime Minister David Cameron during a visit to Halesowen College, West Midlands. Credit: David Jones/PA Wire

Read: 'One million' public sector workers set to strike

The Prime Minister attacked low turnouts in some ballots, pointing out that only 27% voted on whether to strike in a 2012 walkout.

During his weekly questions in the Commons, he said: "I don't think these strikes are right...I think people should turn up for work.

"I think the time has come for looking at setting thresholds in strike ballots... The (NUT) strike ballot took place in 2012, based on a 27% turnout.

"How can it possibly be right for our children's education to be disrupted by trade unions acting in that way? It is time to legislate and it will be in the Conservative manifesto."

Read: What schools are affected by strike action in your area?

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GMB: We are 'hoping to get the employers to negotiate'

Striking workers want their employers to enter back into negotiations over their "measly" pay rises with unions, a GMB representative told Good Morning Britain.

Regional Representative Joe Morgan was also critical of proposed changes to the number of votes needed before a strike could be held, saying if the same rules were applied to Parliament, "you wouldn't have one MP elected across the country."

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Major strike expected to cause widespread disruption

A strike by thousands of teachers, refuse collectors, firefighters and other public sector works is expected to cause widespread disruption today across our region.

People striking over cuts earlier this year Credit: PA

Parents have been warned there will be school closures but the advice is to check with your local authority. Today's walkout is the largest one-day strike over pay by public sector workers since 2010.

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One million public sector workers expected to strike

The Government is set to be hit by the biggest strike over pay since it came to power when over a million public sector workers walk out in a bitter dispute.

Lollipop men and women are among those public sector workers striking today. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

Teachers, firefighters, civil servants and transport workers are among the workers downing tools and joining the picket lines over pay, pensions, jobs and spending cuts.

Trade union Unison will stage an early morning demonstration outside Parliament, one of hundreds of events across the country to mark the 24-hour walkout.

Read: One million public sector workers set to strike

Fire fighters out on strike

Firefighters across our region have walked out on strike for five hours in an ongoing row over pensions.

Members of the Fire Brigades' Union walked out at midday. The dispute centres on Government plans to introduce a new pensions scheme nationally. Further industrial action is planned across the weekend.

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