Fancy dress fundraising for rare kidney disease survivor

A woman from Nottingham whose kidneys were destroyed by a disease which affects one person in a million has begun a campaign to raise money for the unit which helped save her life.

Deborah Goodson, 50, almost died from the rare syndrome Goodpastures - which attacks the lungs and kidneys.

She was on dialysis for three years between 2006 and 2009. That was until her brother Mark Tyler, 42, offered to donate his kidney after tests showed he was a compatible match for his sister.

It was a no brainer for me. It's not an easy decision for anybody to make but the difference you can make to somebody is fantastic.

– MARK TYLER, brother

Deborah now spends time raising money for the Nottingham City Hospital, and has raised nearly £5000 to buy new equipment including 24 hour blood pressure monitors.

Today is World Kidney Day which coincides with the hospital's own Kidney Care Appeal, and Deborah, her brother and their mum helped fundraise by selling cakes in the Renal & Transplant Unit.

The staff at the unit saved my life - the care form everyone, from the tea lady to the top consultant, was absolutely amazing. Once you've been in the position I was in, you realise how important the unit is - they give you your life back, and I want to say thank you for that.

– Deborah goodson

Deborah fundraises on World Kidney Day every year and also organises fundraising nights for her friends and family.

Kidney transplants can last between 10-15 years before another donor needs to be found. For now she says her life is almost back to how it was before she became ill, and says that's thanks to the hospital and most of all her brother Mark.