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  1. ITV Report

Autistic boy attacked and left with nail in back of head

9-year-old Romeo Smith was walking towards his home in Mansfield on Sunday when a plank of wood was said to have been thrown at his head. Photo: ITV News.

Nottinghamshire Police says it's considering not criminally prosecuting a gang who allegedly attacked a young boy, leaving him with a nail in the back of his head.

9-year-old Romeo Smith, who has autism, was walking towards his home in Mansfield on Sunday when a plank of wood was said to have been thrown at his head.

Police are considering not prosecuting a gang who allegedly attacked a 9-year-old autistic boy, leaving him with a nail in his head. Credit: ITV News.

Pictures began to surface on social media following the attack on Romeo at the weekend with users commenting with calls for police to step in.

He was later rushed to hospital, speaking to ITV News today, his mother Natasha Smith told us she was shocked by the behaviour of the alleged attackers:

Following the incident, the police issued the following statement:

"We are continuing to engage with the victim's family, working with them to offer a resolution that they are satisfied with. This incident is currently being reviewed by the Youth Offending Team with a consideration to being dealt with via the Restorative Justice route. This would aim to tackle on-going issues which led up to the incident occurring.

Whether a case is dealt with by arrest and prosecution or through Restorative Justice is considered on a case-by-case basis, with all parties involved being consulted in that decision-making process. The Restorative Justice route sees us working closely with both the victim and the offenders, and, where appropriate, their families, to establish a solution that suits all involved.

Most of the cases in which we do use Restorative Justice involve young people.

We recognise that children sometimes do things without considering the consequences or the seriousness of their actions. In cases such as this, where genuine remorse is shown and there is an understanding of the consequences of their actions, we try to mediate between both parties to avoid progressing down the criminal justice route.

Restorative Justice not only avoids people being criminalised at a young age it is also an important tool in quickly reintegrating them into school and society, hopefully having learnt their lesson without having to pay for it.”