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Wolverhampton's new £5 million market officially opens despite criticism

Wolverhampton's new market officially opens Credit: BPM Media

Wolverhampton Market will officially reopen today (Saturday 21 July) after a long awaited £4.9 million make-over.

The market opened for trade earlier this week (Tuesday 17 July) after being relocated from Market Square to its new site opposite the Wulfrun Centre.

It's part of a £55 million development of the Westside area. However, it has been criticised by local who say it is "ugly" and a "waste of money"

Local Conservative Councillor Wendy Thompson has criticised the council for spending almost £5 million on "containers".

Artist impression of what the site Credit: Artist's impression

It's thought that old containers are not quite the sort of thing to put to a five million pound project. It's apparently supposed to be a cutting edge, industrial design from the Camden School, but what people see are a bunch of old containers.

There are talks about should it be put in for a Turner Prize, because if an unmade bed could win perhaps container-gate for Wolverhampton could also be successful.

– Cllr Wendy Thompson, Wolverhampton City Council

Wolverhampton City Council have defended the design, saying "modern design is subjective and people will always have their own opinions on it".

The market has moved from its home in Market Square Credit: BPM Media

This is a bold, brave, contemporary design, inspired by similar markets design concepts using shipping containers in cities across Europe. It is fantastic that it has provoked a debate and is getting people talking about the new City of Wolverhampton Market. We didn't want a bland and anonymous design for this important new asset and this sort of debate often follows brave design concepts - I remember the initial reaction to the Angel of the North and the Selfridges building in Birmingham, both of which of course are now seen as iconic installations.

– Councillor Steve Evans, Cabinet member for city environment