Live updates

Park rangers baffled by mystery appearance of carrots

A ranger spots one of the piles of carrots Credit: Severn Trent Water

Rangers at Draycote Water park near Rugby in Warwickshire say they are baffled by the mystery appearance of piles of carrots.

The mounds have been left in random places at the Severn Trent Water visitor attraction on a number of occasions.

Piles were found on:

  • 31 March
  • 12 May
  • 16 July
  • 25 July
  • 1 August

They are appealing for help to find out who is leaving them at the park, and why...

We’re really puzzled by this one...

They don’t get eaten by wild animals like rabbits; they simply remain in little piles, so we’re picking them up.

At first we thought it was just a one off, but then more kept arriving. So we’ve been taking them to Ollie’s Yard, a sanctuary for horses and ponies, nearby.

We’d like them to be used by a good cause, but we’re also keen to understand why they’re being left at Draycote Water.

– Thomas Crawford, Draycote ranger
The carrots are being given to a nearby horse sanctuary Credit: Severn Trent Water

Rangers are asking anyone who might know why the carrots are being left at Draycote to tweet them.

  1. Calendar

Touchscreen tortoises studied by Lincoln academic

Tortoises have been the subject of a study led by a University of Lincoln academic.

The reptiles were monitored to test their navigational skills and managed to work out how to win a strawberry by pressing the screen.

A red triangle on the screen was followed by two blue circles. The tortoises were trained to press either the left or right circle to get a strawberry.

Dr Anna Wilkinson found that when food was given to the tortoises in two blue bowls, similar to the circles, the tortoises went for the food on the same side as the circle they were trained to press.

Advertisement

  1. Calendar

Touchscreen tortoises lead scientific research

Scientists at the University of Lincoln have discovered the reptiles are really rather quick on the uptake in groundbreaking research using the kind of touch screen technology we are all accustomed to.

They might be on the slow side and give a rather ponderous appearance, but it seems the humble tortoise is actually something of a whizz when it comes to learning new skills.

Victoria Whittam reports:

  1. Calendar

Tortoises learn to use touchscreen

Researchers at the University of Lincoln have trained tortoises to use touchscreens as part of a study to test the animals' intelligence.

The reptiles were given a choice of shapes on a screen and managed to work out how to win a strawberry by pressing a blue circle on screen. Watch them in action:

Researcher Dr Anna Wilkinson explains why the tortoises are willing to perform:

Advertisement

CCTV of rare Amur leopards at Twycross Zoo

CCTV has been released by Twycross Zoo of two of the world's most endangered big cats.

Video courtesy of Twycross Zoo.

Amur leopards live in China and south-eastern Russia.

With fewer than 50 of the cats left in the wild, the new arrivals form part of a conservation effort to save the species from extinction.

Cute! World's rarest big cats born at Twycross Zoo

Staff at Twycross Zoo are celebrating the pitter-patter of little paws after the birth of two of the world's most endangered big cats, the Amur leopard.

Amur leopards are the most endangered big cats in the world, with fewer than 50 left in the wild Credit: Twycross Zoo

With fewer than 50 of the cats left in the wild, the new arrivals form part of a conservation effort to save the species from extinction.

The two new arrivals form part of a conservation effort Credit: Twycross Zoo

Amur leopards live in China and south-eastern Russia, where they face the threat of poaching, illegal logging, forest clearance and land development - on top of the risks posed by disease and in-breeding in such a small population.

Load more updates