Live updates

East Mids Ambulance still failing 999 response times

An East Midlands Ambulance in action in Nottingham Credit: ITV News Central

East Midlands Ambulance Service is still failing to reach its target of responding to 75-per cent of 999 calls within eight minutes.

Just over 70 percent of their vehicles reached their destination within the time limit in the last year.

A spokesperson for the service insists they are reaching more emergency calls within 8 minutes than in previous years.

Advertisement

Six 'super strength' heroin deaths 'extremely sad'

Drug users in Nottinghamshire are being warned about a rogue batch of heroin which is thought to be behind six deaths in the county in one week.

The victims were all part of a drug rehabilitation programme. Police and public health officials believe the heroin is up to three times stronger than normal.

Dr Chris Kenny who works in Public Health at Nottinghamshire County Council, says it's a sad case as these people were on the 'road to recovery'.

Hospital orders independent review into care of four-year-old boy with autism

In a statement, the trust which runs the Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham says its original investigation found no negligent practice by staff involved in Harry Procko's care but says it's addressing weaknesses.

The hospital has commissioned a separate independent review, the findings of which they will discuss with the family.

“We have completed our own detailed investigation of Harry’s care. An external independent expert has carefully considered our investigation of this case and Report. We have since commissioned a separate external, independent review into Harry’s clinical management while in our care in June 2014. We are awaiting this Report.

“Our investigation found no negligent practice by staff involved in Harry’s care. The Report describes some weaknesses in our processes, which we are addressing, and we did not take a blood test which was originally planned. Harry received regular observations and oral fluid in both ED and the children’s assessment ward. Harry’s condition was judged to have to have improved on the ward.

“The blood test was no longer thought necessary by the doctors looking after him. Our doctors agreed that he could return home overnight. On the ward the following morning a consultant judged that Harry was then well enough to be discharged from hospital without a blood test.

“We have discussed the main findings of our investigation with Harry’s family and shared the full Report with the family and Coroner. We will share the second Report with the family and Coroner as soon as this is available. The Trust continues to assist the Coroner with her investigation into Harry’s death and will contribute to the forthcoming inquest.”

– Peter Homa, Chief Executive, Nottingham University Hospitals Trust

Advertisement

Load more updates