Call for St George's bank holiday

As a Midland MP calls for St George's Day to become a national holiday, a new study finds that the West Midlands scored the highest for the number of people able to name the date of St George’s Day.

Country must 'catch up on Englishness'

A director at organisation British Future says the rest of the country now needs to 'catch up' after research into 'Englishness' released today found that the West Midlands is the only region where most people can name the date of St George's Day.

Perhaps it's pride in being the birthplace of Shakespeare, maybe it's being at England's geographical heart - people in the West Midlands topped the poll for pride and patriotism in St George.

What we're asking is how can the rest of the country now catch up? The answer has to be doing more to celebrate St George's Day as an inclusive festival of England today that can bring people together.

– British Future Director, Sunder Katwala

MP calls for St George's Day holiday

The MP for Stratford-upon-Avon, Nadhim Zahawi, is spearheading calls for St George’s Day, which is also William Shakespeare’s birthday, to become an officially recognised Bank Holiday.

Nadhim Zahawi wants St George's Day to be a Bank Holiday Credit: David Jones/PA Archive/Press Association Images

The Conservative Member of Parliament, who has previously backed areas of English heritage, attempted to put forward a bill in the House of Commons to make St George’s Day a Bank Holiday back in 2010, but the bill was withdrawn and failed to progress further.

The move comes after research revealed today that only 40% of English people can name the exact date of St George's Day.

Read more: West Midlands is the heart of 'Englishness'

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West Midlands is the heart of 'Englishness'

A new study released today has found that the West Midlands is the only region where most people can name the date of St George’s Day, with 50% able to name the date exactly.

The celebratory day, which honours the patron saint on 23 April each year, marks the traditionally accepted date of Saint George's death.

The English flag of Saint George Credit: /Eye Ubiquitous/Press Association Images

However, research found that on average only 40% of English people can name the day, while 71% of people know that US Independence Day falls on the 4 July, and 42% are aware that St Patrick’s Day is on 17 March.

While the West Midlands topped the list, others faltered, with just 36% knowing the date in London and 37% in Yorkshire. 74% of people in the West Midlands also know when US Independence Day is, while 41% know the date of St Patrick's Day.