Farmer cleared of manslaughter after rambler killed

Leicestershire farmer Paul Waterfall has been cleared of manslaughter following the death of a walker in a field of cattle. Roger Freeman was attacked as he walked with his wife on a footpath in Stanford-on-Soar in November 2010.

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Farmer cleared of manslaughter after rambler killed in field of cattle

A Leicestershire farmer has been cleared of manslaughter following the death of a walker in a field of cattle.

Paul Waterfall had denied manslaughter by gross negligence after Roger Freeman was attacked as he walked with his wife on a footpath in Stanford-on-Soar in November 2010.

Nottingham Crown Court was told Mr Waterfall's bull, Moonriver Zac Pi, was in the field with a number of cows of different breeds.

The prosecution claimed the bull charged at and killed 63-year-old Mr Freeman, from Glen Parva in Leicestershire, and that the farmer had known the animal posed a "deadly risk".

Roger Freeman and his wife, Glenis Credit: ITV News Central

Mr Freeman's wife Glenis told police she believed a bull with horns attacked her as she tried to defend her husband. During the trial, however, the court heard the bull did not have horns.

The bull was put down after the attack.

Giving evidence, Mrs Freeman said she was no longer sure the animal that attacked her and her husband had horns.

Paul Waterfall Credit: ITV News Central

Mr Waterfall had denied knowing the bull was aggressive or that it posed a risk to members of the public.

A jury of eight men and four women took just over two and a half hours to find the 39-year-old dairy farmer not guilty following a four-week trial at Nottingham Crown Court.

There were sighs of relief from family and friends of the farmer who had sat through the trial, including his wife Julia.

Mr Waterfall declined to comment after today's hearing out of respect for the Freeman family but said he was relieved the case was over.

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Farmer denies bull that killed rambler was aggressive

The defendant, Paul Waterfall Credit: ITV News Central

A farmer, accused of manslaughter after a walker was allegedly killed by his bull, has denied that the animal was aggressive.

Paul Waterfall, whose farm is on the Nottinghamshire/Leicestershire border, told jurors at Nottingham Crown Court that the Brown Swiss bull, named Moonriver Zac Pi, had never shown any aggression towards him or his staff.

Prosecutors allege the bull fatally attacked 63-year-old Roger Freeman as he walked along a public footpath with his wife Glenis, which crossed Waterfall’s farm in Stanford-on-Soar.

Roger Freeman and his wife, Glenis Credit: ITV News Central

They also claim Waterfall knew the bull posed a “deadly risk” to walkers, and had described the animal as a “nasty and aggressive” bull who “kept walkers on their toes” in the weeks before the attack on 12 November 2010.

The defence opened their case today, with Martin Meeke QC claiming the bull was not aggressive, and had it been, the defendant would have sent it to slaughter. Mr Meeke said Waterfall had done just that in 2005 with a bull he did not trust.

Paul Waterfall denies manslaughter by gross negligence. The trial continues.

Court told bull attack was 'complete and utter nightmare' by widow

Glenis Freeman and her late husband Roger
Glenis Freeman and her late husband Roger Credit: ITV News Central

A court has heard from the widow of Roger Freeman who was killed by a bull as they walked along a public footpath.

Glenis Freeman, 67, described the attack as a 'complete and utter nightmare'.

She described how her husband was floored by the attack and could not get up. She then tried to distract the animal from her husband with her rucksack but the bull charged at her twice.

I felt like one time it was sitting on me. I think I was being rolled over as well. It then left me and went back to Roger.

Mrs Freeman then ran from the field and flagged down a motorist, she was then taken to Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham.

Paramedics found Mr Freeman face down in a field, he was pronounced dead at the scene.

Farmer Paul Waterfall, who owns the farm in Nottinghamshire, is on trial at Nottingham Crown Court charged with manslaughter by gross negligence. He denies the charge.

Jury told rambler killed by bull in 'foreseeable circumstances'

Glenis Freeman and her late husband Roger Credit: ITV News Central

A jury has heard claims that a rambler killed by a bull on land owned by a Nottinghamshire farmer, died in entirely foreseeable circumstances.

Farmer Paul Waterfall arriving at court this morning Credit: ITV News Central

The prosecution told Nottingham Crown Court that 39 year old farmer Paul Waterfall, of Underhill Farm in Stanford on Soar, had a duty of care to members of public who crossed his land, and that he was grossly negligent in taking steps to deal with the risk.

Flowers left at the scene of the bull attack Credit: ITV News Central

Roger Freeman was attacked by the bull as he walked along a public footpath in the field, with his wife. Mr Waterfall denies manslaughter by gross negligence. The trial continues.

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