Derby cancer charity to pay for Ashya King's treatment

A cancer charity in Derby said the King family have accepted their offer to pay the full cost of the proton beam treatment for five-year-old Ashya.

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Derbyshire charity on standby for Ashya Prague trip

Ashya King with his parents at a hospital in Malaga. Credit: Credit: King family

A charity based in Derbyshire says it is on standby to fly to Prague after a judge gave the parents of Ashya King permission to take him there for cancer treatment.

KidsnCancer which is based in Chesterfield, has reached out to help Ashya's family, and say people have pledged thousands of pounds to help fund the proton beam therapy on his brain tumour at a specialist clinic.

Mike Hyman from the charity said they are now awaiting official confirmation of the decision.

More details of the agreement reached between lawyers and a hospital in Southampton where he was being treated are due to be heard in the Family Division of the High Court on Monday.

  1. National

UK cancer charity to fund Ashya King's treatment

A cancer charity in Derby said the King family have accepted their offer to pay the full cost of the proton beam treatment for five-year-old Ashya.

Kidsncancer chief executive Mike Hyman told ITV News they have been inundated with donations from the public following the arrest of Brett and Naghmeh King. He said:

It will take at least a £100,000, and probably a £150,000 to pay for the treatment as well as the cost of accomodation for the months of the treatment for the family. It is our wish that they come back from wherever they go they are not in debt, and can return to their normal life.

The situation they have been through is absolutely appalling. To be imprisoned like criminals, 300 miles away from their sick child is disgraceful and disgusting.

I have been overwhelmed by the generosity of the public, who obviously feel like we do that this family deserve support at this desperate time.

– Mike Hyman, CEO, KidsnCancer

The donation page set up by the charity has made almost £24,000 so far.

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