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BBC journalist 'took his own life'

A post-mortem examination found BBC Coventry and Warwickshire reporter, Russell Joslin, died from asphyxiation after obstructing his own airway.

Recording a verdict that Mr Joslin took his own life, coroner Louise Hunt said "multiple factors" appeared to have affected him.

We know from the medical evidence that Russell was paranoid.

He had had a lack of sleep, there was a lack of career progression and he was frustrated with the situation with the colleague.

I don't think one of those factors can be split out. In my view they were all relevant and interplayed together."

– Coroner Louise Hunt

Mr Joslin's father, former Chief Constable of Warwickshire Police, Peter Joslin, said his son was being harassed by a female colleague.

BBC reporter subjected to 'unwanted advances' by corporation colleague before suicide

Russell Joslin Credit: ITV News Central

An inquest has today heard claims that a BBC Coventry and Warwickshire reporter, Russell Joslin, who is believed to have killed himself, was subject to 'unwanted advances' by a female colleague.

Former Chief Constable of Warwickshire Police, Peter Joslin, said his son Russell had become more and more concerned about the pressure the woman had put on him.

An inquest in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, heard that Mr Joslin, 50, died in hospital last October, three days after being struck by a bus.

Mr Joslin, a BBC Coventry and Warwickshire radio reporter, had previously been treated at a mental health unit in March last year.

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Ding Dong song misses out on Number One in charts

The 'Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead' song has missed out on the top slot in the official UK charts despite a campaign to promote the song in the wake of Margaret Thatcher's death.

Instead of playing the 51-second song in full, BBC Radio 1's chart show played a Newsbeat report that included a five-second excerpt.

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BBC defends decision to play 'Ding Dong' song

The BBC has defended its decision to play five seconds of the song Ding, Dong The Witch Is Dead on the Radio 1 chart show this Sunday.

The song has sped up the charts since the death of Baroness Thatcher, propelled by a campaign on Facebook.

The BBC's new Director General Lord Hall said banning the song risked giving what he called a "distasteful campaign behind the song" more publicity.

ITV News Correspondent Juliet Bremner reports:

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BBC DG: Wrong to ban Ding Dong song 'outright'

BBC director general Tony Hall said an outright ban of the Ding Dong record on Radio 1's chart show would have given the track more publicity:

I understand the concerns about this campaign. I personally believe it is distasteful and inappropriate. However, I do believe it would be wrong to ban the song outright as free speech is an important principle and a ban would only give it more publicity.

I have spoken at some length with the Director of Radio Graham Ellis and Radio 1 Controller Ben Cooper.

We have agreed that we won't be playing the song in full, rather treating it as a news story and playing a short extract to put it in context.

– Tony Hall
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Thatcher supporters tell BBC to play Witch Is Dead song

UKIP leader Nigel Farage and Conservative MP Philip Davies, who are both supporters of Margaret Thatcher, told the Daily Telegraph that the BBC should broadcast the song 'Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead'.

If you suppress things then you make them popular, so play the bloody thing. If you ban it it will be number one for weeks.

Personally I think that the behaviour of these yobs - most of whom weren’t even born when Lady Thatcher was in power - is horrible, offensive and disgusting.

– UKIP leader Nigel Farage

I think that the campaign is pathetic, small minded and mean spirited...but to be perfectly frank the BBC have a chart show and as far as I am concerned they are obliged to play what is in the charts, it is not for the BBC to look at the basis on which something is in the charts, it is a programme of fact.

– Conservative MP Philip Davies
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'Witch is Dead' song headed for top five in Official Chart

The main cast from the classic film 'The Wizard of Oz'. Credit: Reuters

The Wizard Of Oz track 'Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead' which has had a surge of popularity in the wake of Baroness Thatcher's death is on course for a place in the top five.

An online campaign has driven sales of the track, and the latest placings released by the Official Charts Company show it had sold 20,000 copies by Wednesday night, when it was a number four.

It had been at number 10 in the Official Charts Update earlier on Wednesday.

The song is currently at number one on the iTunes and Amazon downloads charts but both physical and digital sales are combined to give the Official Chart rankings.

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