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Inspectors have concerns over Good Hope A&E

Inspectors of hospital services run by the Heart Of England NHS Trust have found concerns in the treatment of patients at accident and emergency units.

The entrance to Good Hope hospital Credit: David Jones/PA Archive/Press Association Images

An inspection of Sutton Coldfield's Good Hope Hospital by the Care Quality Commission found patients in distress being ignored by staff, and others left waiting for long periods on trolleys in hospital corridors.

The inspection team also found areas of good practice at the hospital, including the ability to discharge patients effectively, and supporting patients while they were waiting for a 'critical care' bed.

CQC to inspect hospitals in Leicester

The CQC will be inspecting Leicester's hospitals Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission will start inspecting Leicester's hospitals this week. From today, they'll be visiting Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester General and Glenfield hospitals.

The trust is among the first to be inspected and given an overall rating under radical changes that have been introduced over the way hospitals are monitored.

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Video: Hospitals in our region at risk of "failing" patients

Two of Lincolnshire's NHS Trusts have been branded among the worst in the country by a Care Quality Commission report.

The medical watchdog placed both the Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust and the United Lincolnshire Hospitals Trust in band one - meaning they were at a high risk of failing patients. We spoke to Mike Richards from the CQC.

In a statement, both hospitals said they were making significant progress and were continuing to make improvements to better patient care.

Full list of Midlands trusts - is your hospital 'high risk'?

Ten hospital trusts across the Midlands have been identified as seriously failing to provide the proper care to patients.

Six trusts were judged to be in band one, the most serious category, with a further four placed in band two.

Band 1:

  • Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust
  • Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust
  • Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

Band 2:

  • Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust
  • Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust

Inspectors label six Midland hospitals as 'high risk'

Six Midland hospitals have been labelled "high risk" after inspectors found they fell short of the standards of care expected.

They are among just 24 trusts across the country picked out by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) as being at the most serious level of concern, including higher than expected death rates at their hospitals.

The Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is among those identified as 'high risk' Credit: PA

Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust, Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust, Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust and the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust are among those highlighted.

A total of 161 acute trusts across England were inspected by the CQC, and were judged against more than 150 standards.

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Midland hospitals to face new CQC inspections

Nineteen acute hospital trusts have been selected as the first to receive ratings from the Care Quality Commission (CQC), it was announced today.

The CQC's new hospital inspection programme started in September and will enter its second phase in January. It includes three trusts from the Midlands.

Northampton General Hospital is among those to be inspected in the CQC's second phase Credit: Ian Nicholson/PA

They are:

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust; Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust; Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust; and Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

They have been chosen because they have been flagged as higher risk, or because they are applying to become a foundation trust.

The CQC is also following up on trusts inspected by Sir Bruce Keogh earlier in the year.

The inspections use larger expert teams than previously, including both professional and clinical staff as well as trained members of the public.

Those included in the second phase will be the first trusts to be given ratings by CQC.

Inspection teams to spend longer talking to patients

New plans will see larger inspection teams talking to patients for longer

The Care Quality Commission has announced it will introduce larger inspection teams that will spend longer talking to patients in hospitals.

The CQC launched its plan for the next three years following the Francis Report into the failings at Stafford Hospital.

It is also promising to publish clearer information for the public to help them understand its reports.

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Regulator 'must be better' at challenging poor care

  • Inspectors to "look more closely at how hospitals are run"
  • More clinical experts to be part of inspection teams (i.e. a nurse will help inspect nurses)
  • Look at ways of developing a team of "specialist inspectors"
  • "Listen much harder" to people who use NHS services and use a "wider range of information and evidence" to assess the quality of care.
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CQC chief: 'We haven't stood still, we have made progress'

The chief executive of the Care Quality Commission, David Behan, has spoken about measures that have been put in place to increase confidence in health and social health care services.

He said: "We haven't stood still, we have made progress and we're determined we will continue to make progress.

"Then we can get on with the job that we've been asked to do which is to ensure that people gain access to high quality services."

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