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Children at risk in Coventry has doubled in last year

Social Workers in Coventry say the number of children at risk in the city has almost doubled in the last 12 months. Nine hundred children are now under a child protection plan.

It comes a year after four-year-old Daniel Pelka's mother and her partner were jailed for life for starving and beating him to death.

The City Council is now planning to introduce a special multi-agency support hub involving social workers, teachers, police and health workers.

Council to debate findings of report branding its children's services 'inadequate'

Two years after the death of the Coventry schoolboy Daniel Pelka, children's services in the city have been judged 'inadequate'.

Ofsted inspectors said the department, which failed to stop the four-year-old from being starved, tortured and murdered - is not improving quickly enough.

Tonight, campaigners have described the situation as 'depressing' and say children are still suffering.

This evening the leader and deputy leader of Coventry City Council called for a meeting of all councillors to debate the findings of the report on the 15th April.

The council says it is committed to improving services for the most vulnerable children.

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Council calls meeting to discuss Ofsted findings branding children's services 'inadequate'

Coventry City Council have called a meeting of all councillors to debate the findings of an Ofsted report which branded its child protection measures 'inadequate'.

Deputy Leader, Cllr Phil Townshend, said: "We are neither complacent nor in denial about the degree of challenge to be faced. We need to ensure effective but constructive political oversight around managing progress generally, and specifically around the fifteen recommendations from Ofsted."

DFE: Pace of change in Coventry children's services 'not good enough'

The Department for Education has branded the pace of change in children's service in Coventry as 'simply not good enough'.

It comes after a highly critical report by Ofsted, published today, found that children's services in Coventry are inadequate.

We have been concerned about the arrangements for the protection of children in Coventry since the publication of the serious case review into the death of Daniel Pelka in September 2013. We were clear at the time that we expected children's services to dramatically improve without delay, which was why we required the LSCB to undertake a deeper analysis of the wider issues so that Coventry was able to learn lessons from Daniel's death.

While we accept securing sustainable improvement takes time, today's report shows that the pace of change in Coventry has simply not been good enough. We will now consider what further actions are needed to ensure all vulnerable children in Coventry are sufficiently protected.

– A Department for Education spokesperson

1,400 more children referred to social workers in less than a year

More than 1,400 children have been referred to social workers in Coventry in less than a year.

It follows a highly critical report by Ofsted that has found children's services in Coventry to be inadequate.

The report, which was published today, also found that caseloads for social workers in the city are too high.

  • In March 2013, social workers were working with 3,085 Coventry children.
  • By the end of February 2014, social workers were working with 4,529 Coventry children.

Council: 'There is no hiding from Ofsted's inadequate findings'

A highly critical report by Ofsted has found that children's services in Coventry have been judged inadequate by inspectors two years after the death of four-year-old Daniel Pelka.

The schoolboy was murdered by his mother and stepfather after years of neglect and abuse.

Four-year-old Daniel Pelka Credit: West Midlands Police/PA Archive

The report, which was published today, found that caseloads for social workers in the city are too high. Workloads have increased by 46% over the last two years.

A £5.6 million investment in children's service will be spent on creating more social work teams to deal with the huge increase of referrals.

The report did highlight a positive step in the new leadership of the service.

Councillor George Duggins, Coventry City Council's Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said there is no hiding from the report:

"There is no hiding from the fact that the report's overall findings are disappointing but many of the problems we face, particularly in the front line of children social care, is down to the fact of the unprecedented volume of work which continues to increase."

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Coventry children's services judged 'inadequate'

Daniel Pelka died after being starved and beaten by his mother and her partner Credit: West Midlands Police

Children's services in Coventry have been judged inadequate by inspectors two years after the death of schoolboy Daniel Pelka. The four-year-old was murdered by his mother and stepfather after years of abuse and neglect.

The highly critical report by Ofsted found that caseloads for social workers are too high, and children are at risk of harm.

The lead councillor for children's services has vowed there will be a "rapid improvement" in services.

Councillor George Duggins, Coventry City Council's Cabinet Member for Children and Young People said:

"As the Ofsted report reflects, the findings are not a verdict on the staff who are working extremely hard in the face of ever increasing workloads and their passion, commitment and dedication cannot be questioned.

"We have already responded to this challenge by adding another team of social workers and we have funding to add more as part of the additional £5.6 million because as a Council safeguarding is one our highest priorities."

Report into why nobody helped Daniel Pelka released

A report examining the reasons for a series of failings which led to the death of Coventry youngster Daniel Pelka has said child protection workers were forced to juggle "too many competing priorities".

Four-year-old Daniel died in March 2012 after a campaign of abuse by his parents, who starved, tortured and eventually murdered him.

Daniel Pelka died after being starved and beaten by his mother and her partner Credit: West Midlands Police

A series of errors was identified where police, teachers and social care workers failed to spot what was going on - and the Deeper Analysis and Progress Report, by the Coventry Safeguarding Children Board, was requested by government minister Edward Timson last year.

He asked the board to investigate why information was not effectively recorded, why information was not shared, and why four separate assessments by social care workers failed to identify the risks to Daniel.

It claims that Daniel's case was "extreme and outside the experience of most professionals" and identifies a number of failings - including overworked child protection staff, poor leadership at Daniel's school, and poor communication between different agencies.

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