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Students stabbed in Malaysia made honorary doctors

Medical students Neil Dalton, left and Aidan Brunger, were fatally stabbed in Malaysia
Medical students Neil Dalton, left and Aidan Brunger, were fatally stabbed in Malaysia Credit: ITV News Central

A medical student from Derbyshire who was stabbed to death while on placement in Malaysia is to a receive his degree posthumously.

Neil Dalton from Belper, and fellow student Aidan Brunger from Kent, were killed after a fight at a bar in Borneo on August 6.

The 22-year-olds were both students at Newcastle University, and it has confirmed they will both get their MBBS degrees which will mean they have the title Dr.

Four men have admitted killing the students, and another man has been arrested.

Inquest into death of stabbed Derbyshire student due to be held on Monday

Neil Dalton
Neil Dalton Credit: Facebook

An inquest into the death of a medical student from Ambergate in Derbyshire who was stabbed to death in Borneo is due to be held on Monday.

Neil Dalton, and his friend Aidan Brunger, from Kent, were killed after a row in a bar on August 6.

Four local men have admitted the killings, according to Malaysian Police.

A fifth man, aged 55, has also been arrested in connection with the incident.

The hearing into the deaths of the two 22-year-old students will be held at the Derby and South Derbyshire Coroner's Court.

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Fibre optic broadband for 6,000 Derbyshire businesses

The nationwide government rollout has reached more than a million homes and businesses
The nationwide government rollout has reached more than a million homes and businesses Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

More than 6,000 businesses across Derbyshire can now access high speed fibre optic broadband.

It is part of a government rollout across the country which has reached more than a million homes and businesses.

The county council says another 1,600 will have access to it by the autumn.

Cancer drug's price makes it 'impossible' to support

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has spoken of their 'disappointment' at not being able to recommend a breast cancer drug which can extend the life of terminal patients for up to 6 months.

Even with the extra flexibility that we can apply to cancer drugs, the price that Roche, the manufacturer are charging, makes it impossible to make that positive recommendation to the NHS.

– Andrew Dillon, Chief Executive of Nice

Terminal cancer sufferer condemns withdrawal of drug

A terminal cancer sufferer from Derbyshire has condemned the decision by the NHS drugs watchdog to withdraw the use of the drug Kadcyla to fight the disease on the grounds of cost.

The drug, which can add months to the life of women dying of breast cancer, costs £90,000 for a course of treatment.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said the drug was too expensive to recommend for widespread use in the health service.

Hayley Kalinins, from Borrowash, said: "How can they put a price on anybody's life?

"They do need to bring the cost of the drug down - that is obvious to everybody.

"It's been the miracle drug (for me). I've undergone four different types of chemotherapy before starting this drug.

"I've been on this drug for 18 weeks and experienced very minimal side effects from it, enabling me to have good family times with the four children."

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National

Breast cancer drug decision 'an injustice'

The manufacturer of a breast cancer drug which has been deemed "too expensive" to be offered by the NHS has hit back at the decision.

Dr Jayson Dallas, general manager of Roche Products Limited, declared it "an incredible injustice."

Despite Roche offering a significant discount, we are once again disappointed that Nice has not shown any flexibility on access to Kadcyla.

Refusing patients access to this drug is an incredible injustice and tantamount to turning the clock back in cancer research and development. We plan to appeal this decision.

– Dr Jayson Dallas
National

Breast cancer drug manufacturer 'could have done more'

The manufacturer of a breast cancer drug that offers a last hope to patients could have been "more flexible" to help make the drug affordable for the NHS, a health service boss said.

Sir Andrew Dillon, chief executive of the NHS financial watchdog Nice, which has ruled Kadcyla is too expensive for NHS use, said:

Although Roche proposed a discount to the full list price of Kadcyla, it made little difference to its value for money, leaving it well above the top of our specially extended range of cost effectiveness for cancer drugs.

We are really disappointed that Roche were not able to demonstrate more flexibility to help us make a positive recommendation. The company is well aware that we could not have recommend Kadcyla at the price it proposed.

– Sir Andrew Dillon
National

NHS won't offer 'last hope' breast cancer drug

NHS
The NHS financial watchdog, Nice, has decided Kadcyla is too expensive. Credit: PA

The NHS will not offer a drug that gives patients with advanced breast cancer a last hope because it is too expensive.

Women with HER2-positive breast cancer, which has spread to other parts of their body and has not responded to initial treatment, can see their lives extended by around six months by Kadcyla.

However, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has ruled that at around £90,000 per patient, the drug is too expensive to recommend for widespread use in the health service.

The NHS financial watchdog criticised Roche, who manufactures the drug, for not discounting the treatment further.

Roche said that is had offered to cut the price of the drug and will be appealing Nice's decision.

Tributes paid to students stabbed to death in Malaysia

Neil Dalton, 22. The two fourth-year students had been days away from finishing their training.
Neil Dalton, 22. The two fourth-year students had been days away from finishing their training. Credit: Facebook

Tributes have been paid to two British medical students who were stabbed to death in Borneo following reports of a row in a bar.

Fourth-year student Neil Dalton, from Derbyshire and classmate Aidan Brunger, who were both 22, were reportedly killed in a fight which broke out over complaints the students were being too noisy.

Their devastated families were too upset to speak but their university have paid tribute.

We are all so shocked and saddened by this. They were excellent students, they were doing really well with their studies, they were highly committed and coming back next year to work as doctors. Aidan was aspiring to do some medical research on his return, Neil was going straight into his final year and it's such a tragic thing to occur."

– Professor Jane Calvert, Dean of Undergraduate Studies for Newcastle University Medical School
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