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Conservation underway at RAF Cosford on salvaged German bomber

Work has begun to conserve a Second World War German aircraft which has been lifted from the seabed off the coast of Kent.

The wreckage of the world's last surviving Dornier Do-17 medium bomber was salvaged from the English Channel after 73 years.

It is now at the RAF Museum Cosford. The remaining parts have been moved into two hydration tunnels where they will be sprayed with a mixture of water and citric acid to remove a build up of material from the sea. The process could take more than a year.

Keith Wilkinson reports.

Dornier 17 moved to hydration tent

Dornier 17 is ready to be coated in a solution of water and citric acid Credit: ITV News Central

The last remaining Dornier 17 is under-going restoration at RAF Cosford after arriving yesterday.

The remains of the plane, that has been under water in the English Channel since the Second World War, will now be coated in water and citric acid to remove the barnacles from the metal. This process will take about twelve months.

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Salvaged Dornier 17 bomber facts

The rescue process Credit: RAF Cosford

The bomber was shot down over the Kent coast more than 70 years ago.

More than 1,500 examples of the Dornier 17 medium bomber were built.

Nicknamed the Luftwaffe's 'flying pencil' bombers because of their narrow fuselage, this aircraft is said to be in 'remarkable condition'.

The rescue project Credit: RAF Cosford

Experts are excited by the find because other than the effects of sea life, such as barnacles, coral and marine life, it is largely intact.

The main undercarriage tyres remain inflated.

Detailed facts about the bomber

A video of the aircraft underwater before it was rescued

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