Live updates

Man who fell from Bullring dies

Anthony Hollis, 49-years old

Parents of a man who fell from the Bullring shopping centre in Birmingham, have turned off their son's life support machine, eight days after he climbed over the railings.

On Sunday afternoon, the couple gave medical staff permission to switch off the equipment after finding out that their son, 49-year old Anthony Hollis, had suffered massive brain injuries and multiple breaks.

Anthony, who suffered from autism and epilepsy, died at Edgbaston’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Anthony's parents, Linda and Philip Hollis, say it was a 'cry for help' after he'd been targetted by conmen.

The men who gained the trust of Anthony, arrived on the doorstep of his sheltered accommodation knowing his name, address and medical conditions.

Linda and Philip Hollis, Anthony's parents

Advertisement

'It was a cry for help' say parents of a man who fell from the Bullring

The parents of a man who's fighting for his life in hospital after falling from the top floor of the Bullring at the weekend say it was a 'cry for help' after he'd been targetted by conmen.

49-year old Anthony Hollis has autism and epilepsy and his parents believe he was targetted because he's vulnerable.

The men who gained the trust of Anthony, arrived on the doorstep of his sheltered accommodation knowing his name, address and medical conditions.

Specialist epilepsy treatment, full report

One of our region's hospitals has become on of just four in the country to be a designated centre for epilepsy surgery. Three times more children will now be able to benefit from life-changing treatment at Birmingham Children's Hospital.

One of the first is 16-year-old Jonathan Beale. He's hoping the operation he had today will enable him to lead a normal life. Kate Fisher reports

Birmingham Children's Hospital becomes designated centre for epilepsy

Jonathan during surgery Credit: ITV Central

Sixteen-year-old Jonathan Beale, who is from Bromsgrove, is one of the patients to have specialist epilepsy treatment at Birmingham Children's Hospital.

The hospital has become one of just four in the country to be a designated centre for epilepsy surgery.

Johnathan is hoping the operation he's having today will enable him to lead a normal life in the future.

Government funding means that three times more children will now be able to benefit from life-changing treatment.

Epilepsy care call

A report out this week says that although 1 in 200 children in the UK are affected by epilepsy - the standard of care they receive varies greatly. The group Young Epilepsy have responded saying:

"The support received by young people with epilepsy just simply is not good enough. The effects of the condition can be devastating and should not be underestimated. It is unacceptable that around 50% of young people living with epilepsy are not achieving their full potential. Early and accurate detection are crucial factors in effective management of epilepsy, we must see a step change in services to make this a reality.”

– David Ford, Young Epilepsy Chief Executive

Advertisement

Epilepsy care call: report authors

A new report says that many children with epilepsy do not get the correct care and support.

About 1 in 200 children in the UK are affected by epilepsy - but the standard of care they receive varies greatly, according to the results of the UK's first national audit of epilepsy care for children and young people. Simon Wigglesworth is the Deputy Chief Executive of Epilepsy Action.

What is epilepsy?

In National Epilepsy week, the family of a seven-year-old in Nottingham with the condition, are praising the specialist nursing care their son has received. But what is epilepsy?

Epilepsy Action describe the condition as a tendency to have recurrent seizures (sometimes called fits), caused by a sudden burst of electrical activity in the brain. The normal messages passed between brain cells are disrupted. "Triggers" like tiredness, flashing lights or hunger can cause a fit.

In the UK around one in 20 people will have a seizure at some point in their life, and one in 200 children are affected by the condition. Epilepsy is usually treated with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and information on helping somebody who is fitting is available here.

  1. Kate Fisher

New epilepsy centre of excellence

One of the country's four new specialist epilepsy services is to be based in the Midlands. Birmingham Children's Hospital has been chosen to become a centre of excellence, meaning more children will be able to receive life-changing surgery.

It's estimated that across the Midlands 7800 children under the age of 16 have epilepsy. Central News has met one family already being helped by the facilities at the Children's Hospital.

Load more updates