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More doom and gloom for ash trees

There's more bad news for the country's ash tree population. Scientists have discovered the fungus responsible for Ash Dieback is now resident in the UK - meaning the disease could spread faster and further than before.

The Forestry Commission is warning that an entire generation of trees could be lost. Russell Hookey reports.

Paloma Faith announces gig in Nottinghamshire

Paloma Faith
Paloma Faith Credit: Rebecca Pierce

Paloma Faith has announced that she will be performing a concert in Sherwood Pines Forest, in Nottinghamshire.

It's part of the Forestry Commission's Forest Live concert series that has been organised to bring music to new audiences without commercial branding and sponsorship.

All the money raised from ticket sales goes back into improving the local forests for both people and wildlife.

Paloma has been nominated for Best Album and Best British Female at this year's Brit awards. Her debut album, ‘Do You Want the Truth, or Something Beautiful?’ sold over half a million copies.

She'll be performing in Sherwood Pines Forest in Nottinghamshire on Saturday 15th June. Tickets are available on the Forestry Commission's website.

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New cases of Ash dieback

New cases of Ash dieback Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Telford & Wrekin Council and the Forestry Commission have instigated a plan to remove ash saplings from the new Dawley Learning Community site following a confirmed case of ash dieback.

The case in Dawley is at the site within the newly planted landscape scheme where the replacement for the Phoenix School is being built.

It has been found in a group of trees that were sourced by the main earthworks contractor Birse Civils Ltd from a nursery in Lincolnshire and planted 12 months ago.

Advice issued to stop spread of ash dieback disease

Fears for ash trees in the Midlands
Fears for ash trees in the Midlands Credit: ITV Central
The National Forest has issued advice to stop ash dieback spreading
The National Forest has issued advice to stop ash dieback spreading Credit: ITV Central
Outbreaks have already been confirmed in parts of Shropshire, Worcestershire and in the East Midlands
Outbreaks have already been confirmed in parts of Shropshire, Worcestershire and in the East Midlands Credit: ITV Central
The younger the ash, the more susceptible it is to the disease
The younger the ash, the more susceptible it is to the disease Credit: ITV Central

Action being taken to prevent disease hitting National Forest ash trees

With ash die-back disease now in the Midlands, staff at The National Forest are issuing precautions to people visiting the woodland across three counties.

So far, the Forest is free of the disease, but it has been found in Shropshire, Warwickshire, Lincolnshire and elsewhere in Leicestershire.

Wesley Smith reports.

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Ash die-back fears at National Forest

Forestry staff at The National Forest are issuing precautions to people visiting the 200 square miles of woodland across Staffordshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire.

The Forest is so far free of ash die-back but it has already been found in Shropshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Warwickshire.

The CEO of the National Forest, Sophie Churchill, is urging people to wash shoes and boots when returning from walking in the woods.

There are more than a million ash trees in the Forest and any infection could be devastating, especially as the forest has only been established for twenty years.There's more information at www.forestry.gov.uk

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