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Advice: How to dress for the heat

Dressing appropraitely for the heat can be tricky Credit: Mike Egerton/PA Wire/Press Association Images

With temperatures in the Midlands set to hit their highest all year this week, how should you dress for the workplace to ensure you still look smart without overheating?

Claudia Huxtable, senior fashion lecturer at Birmingham City University, shares her advice for dressing for the heat.

  • Make the most of the sunshine by wearing bright colours and prints.

  • Ladies - sandals are fine and will make your feet feel cooler.

  • Gentlemen - sandals are not fine for the office!

  • Wear natural fabrics - they help your body to breathe as they absorb moisture more effectively.

  • Smart shorts are fine for both men and women, but do check the weather will be sunny all day to avoid getting caught in the rain.

  • Wear shorts just above the knee, short shorts are a big no-no!

  • Wear light colours as they reflect the sun and will make you feel cooler.

  • Gentlemen, leave the ties at home as they'll make you feel constrained and a little hot and bothered.

  • Loose clothing will help cool air to circulate around the body.

  • Finally; unless you’re Kanye, only wear your shades outdoors.

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Video: Extra pressure on ambulance crews working through the heatwave

Ambulance services in the Midlands have seen a big increase in the number of calls because of the recent heatwave. Last month, West Midlands Ambulance Service dealt with more than 71 thousand.

On one day, they took more calls than on New Year's Eve. Yesterday, as temperatures reached 32 degrees, ITV News Central was with one crew as they responded to emergencies brought about by the hot weather.

ITV News Central would like to pass on thoughts and best wishes to Neil who underwent surgery on his hand yesterday and who gave us permission to film his treatment with the ambulance service.

Emergency services braced for wave of 999 calls

Heat warnings in place Credit: Federico Gambarini/DPA/Press Association Images

West Midlands Ambulance saw a massive increase in 999 calls last weekend due to the hot weather, and they're expecting the same this weekend. Last week they had more than 3000 calls.

East Midlands Ambulance Service says their calls are up 15% on what they would expect from an average day.

The Royal Derby Hospital have put their heatwave plan into action - that means cool rooms are available for 'high risk' patients, temperatures are measured four times a day, and extra water is on hand.

  1. National

Tips for the elderly keeping cool in the heat

The elderly and carers must take extra care in the heat, care home Anchor Trust advised today, as temperatures continue to soar.

Carl Martin, Wellbeing Manager at Anchor’s West Hall has issued the following advice in keeping cool in the heat:

  • In the heat, older people should drink plenty of fluids.
  • Stay away from tea, coffee and alcoholic drinks as these are dehydrating.
  • Eat foods that retain water, so plenty of fruit, vegetables and salad.
  • Older skin has less elasticity so can be more sensitive to the sun - they should use a once a day suncream that is photostable.
  • Sun hats and sunglasses are a necessity.
  • It is important to check in on elderly neighbours and friends in the heat.
  • Hot weather can be as dangerous as cold weather.
  • Enjoy the sun in moderation.

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Sales of paddling pools and deodrants soar in heatwave

Sales of dog paddling pools, deodrants and ice lollies are all soaring as the heatwave looks set to enter another week.

  • Sales of deodorants were up 17.5 per cent according to Superdrug
  • Amazon said sales of dog paddling pools had surged while a brand of dog sun wipes were up by 295 per cent
  • Sales of ice lollies increased by 310 per cent, according to Waitrose

Map of heatwave warnings

Heatwave is here to stay Credit: Met Office

The Met Office say the West Midlands is likely to be the most affected by the heatwave over the next 24 hours.

They've increased their warning from level 2 to level 3. Level three means action needs to be taken by healthcare providers to target high-risk groups like the elderly.

The East Midlands remains on level 2 alert.

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