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Woman pregnant with twins carrying genetic disease after IVF test failed

A woman became pregnant with twins carrying a genetic disease after a testing method used by an IVF clinic in Nottingham failed. Credit: PA

A woman became pregnant with twins carrying a genetic disease after a testing method used by an IVF clinic in Nottingham failed.

The woman underwent treatment at the Care Fertility clinic, which has reported five previous serious incidents relating to genetic testing.

In one case, a baby was born with incurable sickle cell anaemia after mistakes at a third party laboratory used by the clinic.

The latest incident, also involving the laboratory, is revealed in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) report on errors committed in the industry last year.

It's not been revealed whether the twins have been born yet.

The woman underwent a process which enables people with a genetic condition in their family to avoid passing it on to their children.

The procedure involves checking the genes and the chromosomes of embryos created through In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF). The woman underwent the process for a chromosomal translocation in September of last year.

Chromosomal translocation occurs when one or more parts of a chromosome breaks off and rejoins in a new location, which can be a different chromosome.

The woman was implanted with an embryo identified as not having this genetic fault and became pregnant with twins.

But subsequent tests showed the pregnancy was affected by the fault after all.

Care Fertility Nottingham have released the following statement.

"The investigation by the HFEA concluded that this incident arose as a result of a recognised but rare technical failure about which patients are informed before treatment."

"There was no evidence of human error and or weakness in the laboratories systems and processes."

– Care Fertility Nottingham

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Doctors: New hope for IVF couples

Doctors studying IVF at the University of Nottingham say a procedure that is widely available could improve chances of having a baby by up to twenty percent.

Dr Lukasz Polanski is part of a group of doctors carrying out a clinical trial into the effectiveness of endometrial scratching which involves damaging the lining of the womb before embryos are implanted.

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New IVF technique 'significantly improves' pregnancy rate

A new procedure called endometrial scratching can improve the clinical pregnancy and birth rate by 20%, a study has found.

Results from a trial undertaken jointly by the University of Nottingham and a team of scientists from Brazil shows an increase in the clinical pregnancy rate of women undergoing IVF and ICSI treatment to 49%, compared with the current average of 29%.

IVF procedure said to increase clinical pregnancy

A study involving a researcher from the University of Nottingham has found that a procedure called endometrial scratching can significantly improve the clinical pregnancy rate.

Results from the trial, undertaken by a team of Brazilian scientists in collaboration with Dr Nick Raine-Fenning from the University of Nottingham, shows an increase in the clinical pregnancy rate of women undergoing IVF and ICSI treatment to 49%, compared with the current average of 29%.

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IVF treatment: Nottingham specialists' new technique could increase odds of having a healthy baby

Fertility specialists in Nottingham have developed a new technique which could increase the number of IVF couples having a healthy baby Credit: Fiona Hanson/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Fertility specialists in Nottingham have developed a new technique which could increase the number of IVF couples having a healthy baby, by more than 50%.

Embryos that are created in the lab are closely monitored using digital photography.

Technicians can then see which ones have developed well, and are more likely to result in a healthy baby.

They say it is the biggest scientific advance in IVF technology since the first test tube baby was born in 1978.

Embryo chromosome testing in the Midlands could increase fertility rate

Couples planning to have IVF treatment for the first time are being encouraged to take part in a unique clinical trial at a Midlands Fertility Centre.

Doctors at the CARE clinic in Nottingham want to recruit 200 couples under the age of 35, and screen their embryos for chromosome abnormalities.

It's the first time in the world a trial like this has taken place, and doctors believe it could increase their pregnancy success rates by up to sixty per cent.

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