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Nurse recruitment drive launched by Leicester hospitals

Hospitals in Leicester have been running a recruitment drive this weekend in a bid to find more nurses.

The initiative comes after a period of intense pressure on hospitals, particularly in accident and emergency departments.

It is hoped that the drive will enable the Leicester Royal Infirmary and University Hospitals of Leicester to attract more qualified staff, especially in specialised departments like theatres.

Former Olympic athlete Colin Jackson opens Oadby Leisure Centre

Former Olympic medalist Colin Jackson has been in Leicestershire to officially open a new fitness centre.

The leisure centre, in Oadby, welcomed a stream of visitors who were invited to try out the facilities for free as well as take on Colin Jackson in a fitness challenge.

The former Olympic hurdler and sprinter also signed autographs and chatted to scores of visitors during the day.

The centre, which is being run in partnership with the borough council, will also boast a new swimming pool which is expected to be finished later this year.

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Nurse recruitment drive as A&E pressures continue

Hospitals in Leicester are holding a recruitment day to try and find more nurses. It comes at a time of very high pressure in hospitals - particularly in A&E departments.

Registered nurses are being invited to look round the city's Royal Infirmary and take part in workshops. They'll be conducting interviews for vacant jobs and giving advice about training opportunities.

Nurse recruitment drive in Leicester Credit: PA Pictures

Mr Powley's family 'devastated' by care home death

Mr Powley's family have released a statement speaking of their guilt and grief over the 85-year-old's death.

“We are still devastated not only by our Dad’s death but also how it came about.

"His stay at Western Park View was only to be for two weeks’ respite while we explored all options for future care.

“We had supported and cared for Dad daily and kept him safe in his own home for six years following a stroke. The fact that he died from injuries sustained as a result of - in our view - inadequate care in a place where he was supposedly safer than at home, is heart-breaking.

“We all have to live with the thought that Dad trusted our decision to place him in temporary respite care and that decision ultimately cost him his life. "We have lost valuable time with our dearly-loved Dad and his young grandchildren have lost the time to build on their relationship and memories of him. Nearly three years on, we are still grieving for our loss and for the huge hole left in all our lives.

“We hope that the lessons learned with regard to exposed pipe work and acceptable temperatures for hot surfaces in care homes will prevent other families having to experience what we have.”

– Mr Powley's son, Colin

HSE: Mr Powley's death 'foreseeable and preventable'

Leicester Crown Court Credit: Lucy Bogustawski/PA Archive/Press Association Images

The care home in which an elderly pensioner was so badly burned that he died of kidney failure days later failed to take proper safety precautions, a judge at Leicester Crown Court has heard.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive found the pipes and valves at the Hinckley home - owned by Western Park Leicester Ltd - were not covered and were reaching temperatures of around 73 degrees centigrade.

Investigators also found that Western Park Leicester Ltd was aware that 85-year-old Mr Powley was at risk of falls and injury. The staff should have been vigilant, but the company failed to manage the risks in his room.

“This was a foreseeable and preventable fatal incident.

"While most of the residents at Western Park View are physically disabled with limited mobility, Walter was not.

He was more mobile, and known to be so, hence at greater danger from any risks in his room.

“The scalding or burning risks from the pipes were longstanding and could have caused injury to any resident. Western Park Leicester failed to heed published guidance from HSE about the need to cover hot pipes and valves. "Had they been covered or boxed-in, Walter’s death could have been prevented.”

– HSE inspector Dr Richenda Dixon, speaking after the hearing
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