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East Midlands universities scoop top student awards

Loughborough University Credit: Loughborough University

East Midlands universities scooped a host of top prizes at last night's Student Choice Awards.

Loughborough University had a particularly successful evening - it was named WhatUni's 'University of the Year', and also took back a series of other trophies.

The poll ranked the University of Nottingham top for job prospects, with Loughborough coming third in that category.

Students who voted thought that Loughborough had the best student union, too, with Nottingham Trent University coming in third place.

Loughborough also came top for student accommodation and took second place in the student vote for best university facilities.

Students at Nottingham Trent University were considered to enjoy the second best 'city life' after Bristol.

Nottingham Trent University Credit: Edward Smith/EMPICS Entertainment

Loughborough was considered to have the third best student support services, while Nottingham Trent came sixth in that category.

Loughborough University consistently comes in the top twenty of UK institutions in league tables. It counts Sebastion Coe, Tanni Grey-Thompson, Paula Radcliffe and Monty Panesar among its alumni.

Monty Panesar Credit: Carl Court/PA Archive/Press Association Images

"We are delighted that our students took time to vote and to know that they rate the Loughborough student experience so highly.

"The award is an opportunity for all members of the University community to celebrate and for me to thank everyone for their contribution to our success.”

– Professor Robert Allison, Vice Chancellor of Loughborough University

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Students told day before: 'You haven't got the grades'

Nottingham Trent University Credit: ITV News Central

Nottingham Trent University has been left embarrassed after prospective students were told they had not achieved their expected grades yesterday - a day before A-level results day.

The university sent out 30 emails telling applicants they had got a place despite not getting their predicted results.

In a statement, the university said:

The issue was identified and resolved very quickly. The emails, which did not disclose any results, were to offer applicants a place on a similar but alternative course.

Richard Whitehead awarded honorary degree

Richard Whitehead during his challenge to run a marathon a day this summer Credit: PA

Paralympic athlete Richard Whitehead MBE will receive an honorary degree from Nottingham Trent University later today.

Richard is the current world record holder for leg amputees in both the half and Olympic marathon distances. He is also the first ever leg amputee to complete the marathon event in under three hours.

This summer the Nottingham-born former Colonel Frank Seely School pupil ran 40 marathons in 40 days - from Land's End to John O'Groats - and raised more than £300,000 for charities Sarcoma UK and Scope.

The double amputee is to receive the Doctor of the University award and will be presented with his degree alongside Nottingham Trent University students at the Royal Concert Hall this afternoon.

School in the woods teaches kids about safety

Annie Woods from Nottingham Trent University with kids at the Forest School Credit: ITV News Central

A senior lecturer in childhood studies has started up a "Forest School" in woods at the university's Brackenhurst campus near Southwell, Nottinghamshire.

Children can learn about risk through climbing trees and searching for insects in a safe and controlled environment.

Under-fives from Lowdham Pre-School spend a morning a week at the site. Staff say it boosts the children's confidence and improves learning.Forest Schools started in Scandinavia where research has found they encourage children to play longer, make them less irritable and less likely to be off sick.

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Protective parents criticised

Annie Woods says children under five need to learn how to manage their own risks without being smothered by their parents

An academic from Nottingham Trent University has rounded on overprotective parents who prevent their children from learning to be careful.

Annie Woods says children under five must learn how to manage their own risks without being smothered by their parents.

She says children should be allowed to climb trees and decide how high they can go so they learn about when to take care.